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Post Link Posted: Sat Sep 06 2008 5:35 pm
Post subject: Another Look at Paul Twitchell's Eck Vidya Readings
Reply to Tian Yue Reply with quote





ECK-Vidya, The Akasa Science of Prophecy, was a small booklet first
published in 1968. The booklet includes 12 predictions made by PT.
Following are summaries of the 12 predictions, which were allegedly
made by PTís reading of the Eck Vidya. I will add a commentary after
each prediction.

1. California isn't going to sink into the ocean any time soon,
contrary to the Cayce predictions, although it would happen later.

How clever. Let's see...PT predicts that another dubious prediction
won't happen. This is so laughable it hurts! Iíd say there were tens
of millions of Californians (like myself) who expressed the same
prediction by the mere fact of continuing to live in California,
ignoring completely Cayceís warning. PT was no different than the
masses of Californians who happily remained in the state. I can get
in on this sort of prediction, too... I hereby predict that a comet
will not hit the earth next week, though my astrologist neighbor
predicts the contrary. Geologists have long established that the
tectonic plates would continue to move over eons of time, gradually
separating part of California, including Baja California, from the
North American continent. This has been public knowledge for some
time. Itís an easy assumption to make that people like Cayce and PT
would have heard of this, and that they would make predictions about
it. PTís prediction reflects the common scientific consensus of our
times.

2. Russia would turn to capitalism by the middle of the next decade
(1970's).

Russia turned to capitalism in 1992, when the Soviet Union collapsed.
PT was off by 20 years, but he did get this one right. We all have
musings that turn out to be true. There were free market economists
who predicted the Soviet Unionís demise during the cold war. They
thought communism assuredly would, or even certainly must, fail
miserably within a few years, so flawed they believed the system to
be. They thought it would fail on principle, thus affirming capitalism
as superior. Based on PTís conservative leaning politics, it is fairly
reasonable to assume PT may have been in that camp. Many in the West
fervently hoped communism would fail due to inherent flaws. So this
prediction isnít very impressive or shocking, considering the cold war
rhetoric of the times. Lots of political observers were
prognosticating the Soviet Unionís demise. Letís seeÖI hereby predict
that when Castroís brother dies, thus ending the dynasty, Cuba will
gradually return to a more democratic form of government. There is a
good chance Iíll be right.

3. A tidal wave would damage Hawaii in about 1981 so badly that it
would take several years to rebuild.

This prediction is interesting in what it reveals. His predictions
were made in 1968, eight years after a large tsunami hit the Big
Island causing severe destruction, including 61 deaths and $23 million
in property damage. Another large tsunami occurred in 1946 which
flooded the downtown area of Hilo killing 159 people and causing more
than $26 million in damages. There was a small, insignificant tsunami
in 1975, in which two campers on the beach died, but with little
impact, if any, on the island. So this prediction is flat out
nonsense. And the fact is, 50 tsunamis have occurred in Hawaii since
the early 1800ís, so to predict that yet another in a long history of
frequent tsunami events would again occur is not difficult. But a
major tsunami that inflicted severe damage did not occur, so heís way
off here.

What I find revealing is his failure to predict the recent tsunami of
2004 that truly was an event of enormous magnitude. When viewed in
this context, heís not only wrong about Hawaii, but actually missed
predicting the real tsunami event that, had it been predicted, and had
he any credibility on the world stage, could have saved hundreds of
thousands of lives. So he not only screwed up that prediction, he
doubly screwed up by failing to predict the real tsunami. So much for
his ability to read the Eck Vidya.

4.America will regain her united spirit again and see a higher level
of living and wealth from about 1975-2000.

Despite this claim, as I recall there was a recession in the 1970's
during the oil embargo, and during the 1980's we had a recession,
coupled with high inflation and high interest rates, and Reagan left
us with staggering, record breaking deficits. During Bill Clintonís
eight year term we had very good stock market returns, and low
unemployment, but that all but vanished under George Bush. The economy
has always had its ups and downs, and always will. Itís not hard to be
correct by predicting "in the future America will unite and have a
better economy" or even to say, "in the future America will be divided
and the economy will be slack." Either way one can't lose, especially
if not held rigidly to a specific time frame. PT used a long period of
25 years in his prediction, but the one consistent period of economic
upturn was the eight years under Clinton between 1992 and 2000.
Economists make predictions all the time, and sometimes they are
right, sometimes they are wrong, but in any case, their occasional
success doesn't make them any more psychic than the average person. By
the way, wages in real dollars are at an all time low. People earn
less now than they did in PTís time. The number of homeless people was
on the rise during the time PT predicted, and poverty was widespread,
but ignored by the average American. The same is true today. Some of
the gains made in the stock market during Clintonís time have been
mitigated by the current downturn. PTís prediction here is very
general and highly debatable, but at best falls short of a big
unifying, bullish period that would last for 25 years. I donít give
him any points here. If heíd wanted to make useful economic
predictions, he would have had to have been far more specific to have
made a significant prediction. I think more people would have wanted
to know about our current mortgage crisis. Too bad PT missed that in
his economic forecast. He also said nothing about poverty in America,
homelessness, decreasing wages, lack of health care, and high costs of
education, and crippling student loans. Cloud nine can be fun, but it
isnít reality.

5. The next great war will be fought not between the nations of this
planet, but between one of the other planets and Earth. This will take
place around 2000.

Whoa, Nelly. Way off the chart on this one, and more than just a tad
loony. And to add to the eyebrow raising silliness, according to some
Eckankar apologists, it may have happened on the inner planes! The
ultimate cop-out. So PTís predictions are all true, they happened on
the inner! I wonder how much of the alien stuff came from his
Scientology influence.

6. The food problem will become acute by around 1980 and the world
will turn to the US to feed them. The US will develop a synthetic food
which will give relief.

A big stretch here, in my view. The U.S. has not come up with a
synthetic food on any mass scale, and it certainly hasnít found a
synthetic food to feed the world. He is wrong in this prediction. By
the way, genetically altered food is not synthetic, and some believe
this development will be looked upon someday as one of the worst
environmental disasters in history as the full consequences take
effect. Europeans are correct in rejecting this technology. Sounds as
though PT had been reading too many science fiction novels. Soylent
Green, anyone?
When PT wrote this (1968) there was a very popular book on the market
that predicted mass world starvation due to the sharply increasing
population. As Wikipedia states, ďThe Population Bomb (1968) is a book
written by Paul R. Ehrlich. A best-selling work, it predicted disaster
for humanity due to overpopulation and the "population explosion". The
book predicted that "in the 1970s and 1980s hundreds of millions of
people will starve to death", that nothing can be done to avoid mass
famine greater than any in the history, and radical action is needed
to limit the overpopulation. History proved Ehrlich wrong, as the mass
starvations predicted for the 1970s and 1980s never occurred.Ē

The bookís warning was very alarming and widely discussed in the
media. But now, world starvation truly is occurring, caused in part by
converting corn crops to ethanol production, thus reducing the food
supply and raising the cost of food, and also by the oil prices, which
affect distribution and even the cost of petroleum based fertilizers.
But still no synthetic food has been produced by the US to save the
world, and in fact, the US may be exacerbating the problem rather than
helping.

It isnít at all a stretch to surmise that a known plagiarist would
read that book (which came out in the same year PT made this
ďpredictionĒ) and convert the bookís thesis into an Eck vidya
prediction. This isnít plagiary, but PT did opportunistically glean
material from near and far to use in his own writings. Iím shaking my
head with dismay. In any case, he was wrong, as was the author of the
book.

7. The shifting of the polar caps will cause an upset in the world
around 2200.

Quite clever here. Anyone can make a prediction that is so far in the
future that no one will live long enough to see.

Let's see... letís have some fun. Hereís a prediction: Around the year
2300, long after we are all gone and no longer concerned with such
issues, Ronald Reagan will be cloned and return to power with his
memory intact. His first act will be to lead the world against the
aliens who took over in 2200. Klemp, who overcomes his present
illnesses will live to be at least 400 years old, and will accuse
Reagan of encroaching on alien personal property when Reagan steals a
space ship from them and leaves the planet for good, as his planetary
bid for world dominance over aliens fails. Klemp had hoped to make a
deal with the aliens in order to leave the planet himself, to make a
new life in the uninhabitable gases of Venus. Rebazar, still living of
course, will relieve Klemp of his duties, stripping him of his
initiations, after Klemp once again stripped down to his birthday suit
in an airport and was arrested for frightening little girls passing
by. I HAVE SPOKEN, heh, heh. Prove me wrong! (See what just a little
imagination can come up with?)

8. A new type of virus will sweep the world in 1975, which will be so
new to scientists that it will take time to develop a remedy.

In one PT publication I recall his predicted virus being a "moon
plague." This has not been proven to have occurred. The fact is there
are many rare viruses that experts have long predicted will eventually
mutate into a form that becomes dangerous to humans, and such viruses
have long been the subject of serious discussion by many besides PT.
The Center for Disease Control has been deeply concerned about this
for ages. One that is really scary is the Ebola virus. Another is the
common flu virus (such as the Spanish Flu that killed millions), like
the bird flu or possibly SARS. Most expert immunologists figure human
kind is due for a life-threatening virus or bacterium to become
epidemic anytime now, especially since weakened immune systems from
overuse of antibiotics and poor nutrition are commonplace. We canít
ignore the emergence of HIV, which is a serious problem worldwide,
along with the resurgence of antibiotic resistant tuberculosis and
news strains of malaria. MRSA looms as well. This is not a difficult
prediction to make. Anyway, considering that plagues have always
struck every so often in our history, I hereby predict with complete
confidence that a terrible virus will sweep the world, and scientists
will not have a remedy. The only thing I canít do is predict exactly
when that will happen. PT, not surprisingly, could do no better.

But a remedy? There are no outright ďcuresĒ for viruses in the world
of biochemical medicine. There are vaccines used to prevent viral
infections, and antiviral drugs to relieve symptoms and pain, but no
outright true "remedies" or cures. Itís still up to the patientís
immune system to do the bulk of the work when a virus is involved. In
any case, HIV, malaria and tuberculosis are still killing millions.

PT wasnít the only one thinking about alien viruses during this
period. Itís interesting that a novel about an alien virus appeared
around the time PTís booklet was published, which reflects the
interests of American culture of the time. The Andromeda Strain
(1969), by Michael Crichton, is a science fiction novel depicting the
efforts of a team of scientists investigating a deadly alien
microorganism which clots human blood. In the novel, scientists
scramble to find a vaccine. Maybe Crichton was reading the Eck Vidya?
Either that or they both were reflecting the imaginings of the times,
just like thousands of others around the world. And letís not forget
PT was somewhat of a science fiction writer.

Hereís a thought: While PT was in the higher worlds reading the Eck
Vidya (with poor reading skills at best) why didnít he try to read
what the actual ďremedyĒ would be, and how it would be developed, to
give us a heads up? If a person has such abilities, what is the
purpose of making predictions? To help humankind, or to show off oneís
ability? There are so many things about our history that PT failed to
see, such as the threat of Osama Bin Laden and the 9/11 catastrophe,
or the Katrina disaster, or the threat of global warming, or the
current mortgage crisis. He missed those, and instead reported
tsunamis in Hawaii that didnít pan out. And notice how broad and
general the predictions are? This tactic is a very safe method to get
things right once in awhile, since it covers almost any possibility.
If more details were provided, it makes it more difficult to shrug off
if the prediction fails. For example, if PT had given some details of
the plague, such as what the symptoms would be, who would be
vulnerable, where it would first break out, then that exposes him even
more if the prediction doesnít pan out. If it were HIV, he could have
said intervenous drug users and gays would be especially vulnerable,
but he cryptically offered no details at all. Which begs the question,
just how much can an Eck vidya reader see in the way of details?
According to some of his readings (the kind that canít ever be
verified), he can see enormous detail, even producing names, dates,
places, and even concepts and words. But with some of his readings,
they lack details and turn out to be bunk.

9. Children will start to be taught by TV via home study around the
end of the century.

Online courses exist. But thatís on the internet, which is a truly
monumental technological development of huge historical proportions
that PT failed to predict. And as I recall, there were some televised
courses on public television (UHF) as far back as the sixties. But
PTís prediction wasnít the advent of televised courses (not a hard
thing for anyone to guess), but of the advent of kids staying home to
study from TV. I seriously doubt that children will stay home and
learn exclusively from their TVís, even with televised classes,
anytime soon. Many if not most parents lack the skills to teach their
own kids. There is presently no indication that professionally trained
teachers, directly teaching kids, are going to be replaced with home
schooling using tv.

10. By the late 1980's the minerals and precious metals will have
disappeared from their usual places, forcing exploitation of the
Amazon basin, the South Pole and some part of the African jungles.

Depletion of resources has long been predicted by geologists and
environmentalists. All one
had to do was read a newspaper or science journals, and Iíve no doubt
that is exactly what PT did. And searching for new sources of raw
materials in unpopulated, remote, and inaccessible regions has long
been a subject of discussion. In fact, the search for gold and other
resources in remote lands is what the voyages of such navigators as
Columbus was all about. This is a prediction that is too easy. No
points here. Speaking of the polar caps, he failed to make what would
have been a stupendous prediction, which is the melting of the polar
ice caps due to global warming. Now_that_ would have been useful.

11. By the end of the century voting will be done by instant
electronic machines by voters in their homes, instead of at the polls.

Weíre now in 2008, and weíre far from voting in our homes. In fact,
voting fraud and errors are a big concern, and oversight of the voting
process is increasing, making it highly unlikely weíll be voting in
our homes anytime soon, since the potential for voter fraud would
increase. And again, PT failed to predict the advent of the internet,
which could have made home voting technologically possible. He keeps
missing the real veins of gold in his ďreadings.Ē The internet is
changing our culture, and yet PT rattles on about events that havenít
happened, rather than hit the bullís eye of the amazing events that
have.


12. By the end of the century, orthodox religions will have begun to
lose ground, along with other semi-religious and occult arts such as
astrology, yoga, and many of the present day cults, although ECKANKAR
will begin to grow.

From all that I can see, yoga and other similar practices are once
again on the rise. Just about everyone I know goes to yoga classes
these days. Taijichuan and qigong are hugely popular. Cults like
Scientology and TM are still around and in the news (anybody find it
ironic that PT refers to ďcultsĒ in his prediction?). And from all
that I can see, people are still involved with Christianity, as
evidenced by the power of the Christian right over our politics.
Conservative Christian theology and ideology has become a large
political and cultural force in our society, as demonstrated by the
recent vice presidential pick of Palin, who was chosen in part to
assuage the evangelical right wing. The abortion issue, as well as
creationism, and other anti-science propaganda, such as the refusal to
admit the existence of global warming among some Christians, have run
rampant in political debate. Politicians still get elected only if
they regularly attend church and are sufficiently pious. Bush has said
his (Christian) God talks to him about foreign policy, and the public
generally seems to accept that. And Eckankar has not grown by all that
I have seen. In fact, it seems to be in decline. No, PT gets no cigar
on this one.

Overall, I'll generously give PT one clearly correct prediction (the
turn to capitalism by the Soviet Union, although, as I noted, many
political and economic pundits were hoping, praying and predicting
that would occur), 8 clearly incorrect, or ridiculous and
unsupportable, and 3 that would have been predicted by anybody reading
the daily news or using common sense, or were already supported by
predictions from science. PT commented on issues that were in some
ways, I think, rather broad and predictable, such as California NOT
falling into the ocean. So his success rate, to be very generous, is
at best 10 %, or at the very best 20%, or to put this another way, he
was 85% to 95% wrong, hardly proving him to be psychic. Would anyone
with any sanity put their faith in a person who is wrong 85% to 95 %
of the time?

What is far more telling, I think, is his apparent inability to
predict his own death, to ďpredictĒ his own successor Darwin Gross or
Harold Klemp, his failure to predict the internet (which hugely has
affected his teachings, due to spread of information revealing the
Eckankar controversy), his failure to predict David Lane, charges of
plagiarism, and other lamentable difficulties that have troubled his
legacy since his death. Paul Twitchell could not read the Eck Vidya.

Tianyue

PS: If all this isnít enough to ponder, then hereís a repost of
something Joe wrote awhile back:

Talk To God:

Prophecy, Sex, and Liberation
[from TMOSM by D. Lane]

DEAR GURU: Things are so bad for this country that I must ask you to
talk to God about the political future. I am asking as a loyal reader
of Candid Press.
--Jan Baldheim

DEAR JAN: I didn't want to make any predictions on certain events, but
you caught me on a technical point. I did promise to answer the
questions of all Candid Press readers. I predict a bad year for my
competitor, Jean Dixon, as she will have illness and financial loss.
The war in Vietnam will increase until late in 1968 when the doves of
both sides come to the negotiating table. In 1968, Johnson and
Humphrey will run against Romney and Percy--and win again!.
I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

[In his featured column "Talk to God" for CANDID PRESS (December 10,
1967)]

Perhaps the most controversial document to surface about Paul
Twitchell's hidden life is his featured column, "Talk to God," for
Candid Press in 1967. In the column, Twitchell claims to speak
directly with God about reader's personal and spiritual problems. The
founder of Eckankar always ends his words of advice (which he states
comes from God Himself) with the bold statement: I HAVE SPOKEN!

The article raises some serious questions about Twitchell's
personal motives for founding Eckankar. For not only does Twitchell
make erroneous prophecies (as in the preceding quotation, Johnson
never did run for office in 1968 as Twitchell predicted, nor did his
proposed running mate, Humphrey, win the race. Nixon, not Romney as
Twitchell wrongly prophesied, finally won the Presidential Election),
but he also indulges in satirical sexual admonitions. A few graphic
examples will best illustrate the latter:

DEAR MR. TWITCHELL: My penis is too long. Can you ask God to shorten
it for me?
--BIG PETER

DEAR PETER: Why? That's what God said when He heard you wanted a
smaller sex organ. God says that we can all be happy with what He
gives unto us and you shall be happy to.
I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR GURU: I have the strange desire to wear lace panties. As I am a
normal man in every other way, I want to know if God thinks this is
bad?

--FRILLY FRED
DEAR FRILLY: He doesn't think it is good. We talked over your fetish -
for that is what you have. We both feel that your fetish is due to
lack of female companionship. You wish to secure a relationship with a
woman whose initials are P.I. Do not ask how I know nor shall you
question this advice which I now sayeth unto you: Call her and ask her
for a date. She will accept. Do not wear your panties on the date. . .
and you shall never again have a desire to wear panties. I HAVE
SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR LEARNED ONE: My penis is too small for a man of my age. Can you
talk to God and make my penis grow?
--TINY MAN

DEAR TINY: God and I talked about your penis--and God has good news
for you. He says that your penis is of average size and that you only
believe it is too small for you failed to satisfy one woman when you
were 19. Because it is of the proper size, there is no need for God
to
make it grow. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

In the midst of Twitchell's incorrect prophecies and sexual
innuendoes, he also talks about Rebazar Tarzs and Eckankar to his
Candid Press readers. One can't help wondering, however, how serious
Twitchell is in presenting his bilocation philosophy with such a
humorous and mordacious context. Below are a few excerpts from the
column on Eckankar:

DEAR ECK TEACHER: After learning bilocation, I sent my sole-being
[sic] to Vietnam to visit my son who is stationed there-and he didn't
recognize me. Why?
--MRS. HELEN AYNEZ

DEAR MRS.: I was with you that day and I wanted so to allow your son
to see you--but I was hopeless to help you. You see, Eckankar is only
able to function as a path to God--and as such, it is no good if
learned for ulterior motives. You bought my book "Introduction to
Eckankar" just so you could visit your son. As entering God's universe
wasn't your goal, so the true power of Eckankar failed to work fully
for you. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR PAUL: I am only 16 and my problem may not be the type that you
normally talk to God about, but here goes. I am still a virgin! My
three best friends aren't and they always tease me. I want to wait
until I marry, but they keep kidding me. What should I do?
--M. OF MICHIGAN

DEAR M. OF MICHIGAN: If a problem worries a person, then it is
important enough for me to talk to God about. First and most important
is what Rebazar Tarzs once told me. He said: "Unto thine own self and
not beyond." My teacher meant that you must do only what you feel is
best for yourself and these are God's sentiments exactly. By the way,
God wants you to know that your three friends are still virgins. They
are merely trying to sound sophisticated and adult. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

"Talk to God," probably more than any other piece of evidence,
raises the question about the genuineness of Eckankar and about the
authenticity of its founder. It is an issue which we will explore at
length in the next chapter.





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Post Link Posted: Sun Sep 07 2008 12:23 am
Post subject: Re: Another Look at Paul Twitchell's Eck Vidya Readings
Reply to wernertrp Reply with quote



On 7 Sep., 03:35, Tian Yue <tian...@earthlink.net> wrote:

Quote:
ECK-Vidya, The Akasa Science of Prophecy, was a small booklet first
published in 1968. The booklet includes 12 predictions made by PT.
Following are summaries of the 12 predictions, which were allegedly
made by PTís reading of the Eck Vidya. I will add a commentary after
each prediction.

1. † † †California isn't going to sink into the ocean any time soon,
contrary to the Cayce predictions, although it would happen later.

How clever. Let's see...PT predicts that another dubious prediction
won't happen. This is so laughable it hurts! Iíd say there were tens
of millions of Californians (like myself) who expressed the same
prediction by the mere fact of continuing to live in California,
ignoring completely Cayceís warning. PT was no different than the
masses of Californians who happily remained in the state. †I can get
in on this sort of prediction, too... I hereby predict that a comet
will not hit the earth next week, though my astrologist neighbor
predicts the contrary. Geologists have long established that the
tectonic plates would continue to move over eons of time, gradually
separating part of California, including Baja California, from the
North American continent. This has been public knowledge for some
time. Itís an easy assumption to make that people like Cayce and PT
would have heard of this, and that they would make predictions about
it. PTís prediction reflects the common scientific consensus of our
times.

2. Russia would turn to capitalism by the middle of the next decade
(1970's).

Russia turned to capitalism in 1992, when the Soviet Union collapsed.
PT was off by 20 years, but he did get this one right. We all have
musings that turn out to be true. There were free market economists
who predicted the Soviet Unionís demise during the cold war. They
thought communism assuredly would, or even certainly must, fail
miserably within a few years, so flawed they believed the system to
be. They thought it would fail on principle, thus affirming capitalism
as superior. Based on PTís conservative leaning politics, it is fairly
reasonable to assume PT may have been in that camp. Many in the West
fervently hoped communism would fail due to inherent flaws. So this
prediction isnít very impressive or shocking, considering the cold war
rhetoric of the times. Lots of political observers were
prognosticating the Soviet Unionís demise. Letís seeÖI hereby predict
that when Castroís brother dies, thus ending the dynasty, Cuba will
gradually return to a more democratic form of government. There is a
good chance Iíll be right.

3. † † †A tidal wave would damage Hawaii in about 1981 so badly that it
would take several years to rebuild.

This prediction is interesting in what it reveals. His predictions
were made in 1968, eight years after a large tsunami hit the Big
Island causing severe destruction, including 61 deaths and $23 million
in property damage. Another large tsunami occurred in 1946 which
flooded the downtown area of Hilo killing 159 people and causing more
than $26 million in damages. There was a small, insignificant tsunami
in 1975, in which two campers on the beach died, but with little
impact, if any, on the island. So this prediction is flat out
nonsense. And the fact is, 50 tsunamis have occurred in Hawaii since
the early 1800ís, so to predict that yet another in a long history of
frequent tsunami events would again occur is not difficult. But a
major tsunami that inflicted severe damage did not occur, so heís way
off here.

What I find revealing is his failure to predict the recent tsunami of
2004 that truly was an event of enormous magnitude. When viewed in
this context, heís not only wrong about Hawaii, but actually missed
predicting the real tsunami event that, had it been predicted, and had
he any credibility on the world stage, could have saved hundreds of
thousands of lives. So he not only screwed up that prediction, he
doubly screwed up by failing to predict the real tsunami. So much for
his ability to read the Eck Vidya.

4.America will regain her united spirit again and see a higher level
of living and wealth from about 1975-2000.

Despite this claim, as I recall there was a recession in the 1970's
during the oil embargo, and during the 1980's we had a recession,
coupled with high inflation and high interest rates, and †Reagan left
us with staggering, record breaking deficits. During Bill Clintonís
eight year term we had very good stock market returns, and low
unemployment, but that all but vanished under George Bush. The economy
has always had its ups and downs, and always will. Itís not hard to be
correct by predicting "in the future America will unite and have a
better economy" or even to say, "in the future America will be divided
and the economy will be slack." Either way one can't lose, especially
if not held rigidly to a specific time frame. PT used a long period of
25 years in his prediction, but the one consistent period of economic
upturn was the eight years under Clinton between 1992 and 2000.
Economists make predictions all the time, and sometimes they are
right, sometimes they are wrong, but in any case, their occasional
success doesn't make them any more psychic than the average person. By
the way, wages in real dollars are at an all time low. People earn
less now than they did in PTís time. The number of homeless people was
on the rise during the time PT predicted, and poverty was widespread,
but ignored by the average American. The same is true today. Some of
the gains made in the stock market during Clintonís time have been
mitigated by the current downturn. PTís prediction here is very
general and highly debatable, but at best falls short of a big
unifying, bullish period that would last for 25 years. I donít give
him any points here. If heíd wanted to make useful economic
predictions, he would have had to have been far more specific to have
made a significant prediction. I think more people would have wanted
to know about our current mortgage crisis. Too bad PT missed that in
his economic forecast. He also said nothing about poverty in America,
homelessness, decreasing wages, lack of health care, and high costs of
education, and crippling student loans. Cloud nine can be fun, but it
isnít reality.

5. The next great war will be fought not between the nations of this
planet, but between one of the other planets and Earth. This will take
place around 2000.

Whoa, Nelly. Way off the chart on this one, and more than just a tad
loony. And to add to the eyebrow raising silliness, according to some
Eckankar apologists, it may have happened on the inner planes! The
ultimate cop-out. So PTís predictions are all true, they happened on
the inner! I wonder how much of the alien stuff came from his
Scientology influence.

6. The food problem will become acute by around 1980 and the world
will turn to the US to feed them. The US will develop a synthetic food
which will give relief.

A big stretch here, in my view. The U.S. has not come up with a
synthetic food on any mass scale, and it certainly hasnít found a
synthetic food to feed the world. He is wrong in this prediction. By
the way, genetically altered food is not synthetic, and some believe
this development will be looked upon someday as one of the worst
environmental disasters in history as the full consequences take
effect. Europeans are correct in rejecting this technology. Sounds as
though PT had been reading too many science fiction novels. Soylent
Green, anyone?
When PT wrote this (1968) there was a very popular book on the market
that predicted mass world starvation due to the sharply increasing
population. As Wikipedia states, ďThe Population Bomb (1968) is a book
written by Paul R. Ehrlich. A best-selling work, it predicted disaster
for humanity due to overpopulation and the "population explosion". The
book predicted that "in the 1970s and 1980s hundreds of millions of
people will starve to death", that nothing can be done to avoid mass
famine greater than any in the history, and radical action is needed
to limit the overpopulation. History proved Ehrlich wrong, as the mass
starvations predicted for the 1970s and 1980s never occurred.Ē

The bookís warning was very alarming and widely discussed in the
media. But now, world starvation truly is occurring, caused in part by
converting corn crops to ethanol production, thus reducing the food
supply and raising the cost of food, and also by the oil prices, which
affect distribution and even the cost of petroleum based fertilizers.
But still no synthetic food has been produced by the US to save the
world, and in fact, the US may be exacerbating the problem rather than
helping.

It isnít at all a stretch to surmise that a known plagiarist would
read that book (which came out in the same year PT made this
ďpredictionĒ) and convert the bookís thesis into an Eck vidya
prediction. †This isnít plagiary, but PT did opportunistically glean
material from near and far to use in his own writings. Iím shaking my
head with dismay. In any case, he was wrong, as was the author of the
book.

7. The shifting of the polar caps will cause an upset in the world
around 2200.

Quite clever here. Anyone can make a prediction that is so far in the
future that no one will live long enough to see.

Let's see... letís have some fun. Hereís a prediction: Around the year
2300, long after we are all gone and no longer concerned with such
issues, Ronald Reagan will be cloned and return to power with his
memory intact. His first act will be to lead the world against the
aliens who took over in 2200. Klemp, who overcomes his present
illnesses will live to be at least 400 years old, and will accuse
Reagan of encroaching on alien personal property when Reagan steals a
space ship from them and leaves the planet for good, as his planetary
bid for world dominance over aliens fails. Klemp had hoped to make a
deal with the aliens in order to leave the planet himself, to make a
new life in the uninhabitable gases of Venus. Rebazar, still living of
course, will relieve Klemp of his duties, stripping him of his
initiations, after Klemp once again stripped down to his birthday suit
in an airport and was arrested for frightening little girls passing
by. I HAVE SPOKEN, heh, heh. Prove me wrong! (See what just a little
imagination can come up with?)

8. A new type of virus will sweep the world in 1975, which will be so
new to scientists that it will take time to develop a remedy.

In one PT publication I recall his predicted virus being a "moon
plague." This has not been proven to have occurred. The fact is there
are many rare viruses that experts have long predicted will eventually
mutate into a form that becomes dangerous to humans, and such viruses
have long been the subject of serious discussion by many besides PT.
The Center for Disease Control has been deeply concerned about this
for ages. One that is really scary is the Ebola virus. Another is the
common flu virus (such as the Spanish Flu that killed millions), like
the bird flu or possibly SARS. Most expert immunologists figure human
kind is due for a life-threatening virus or bacterium to become
epidemic anytime now, especially since weakened immune systems from
overuse of antibiotics and poor nutrition are commonplace. We canít
ignore the emergence of HIV, which is a serious problem worldwide,
along with the resurgence of antibiotic resistant tuberculosis and
news strains of malaria. MRSA looms as well. This is not a difficult
prediction to make. Anyway, considering that plagues have always
struck every so often in our history, I hereby predict with complete
confidence that a terrible virus will sweep the world, and scientists
will not have a remedy. The only thing I canít do is predict exactly
when that will happen. PT, not surprisingly, could do no better.

But a remedy? There are no outright ďcuresĒ for viruses in the world
of biochemical medicine. There are vaccines used to prevent viral
infections, and antiviral drugs to relieve symptoms and pain, but no
outright true "remedies" or cures. Itís still up to the patientís
immune system to do the bulk of the work when a virus is involved. In
any case, HIV, malaria and tuberculosis are still killing millions.

PT wasnít the only one thinking about alien viruses during this
period. Itís interesting that a novel about an alien virus appeared
around the time PTís booklet was published, which reflects the
interests of American culture of the time. The Andromeda Strain
(1969), by Michael Crichton, is a science fiction novel depicting the
efforts of a team of scientists investigating a deadly alien
microorganism which clots human blood. In the novel, scientists
scramble to find a vaccine. Maybe Crichton was reading the Eck Vidya?
Either that or they both were reflecting the imaginings of the times,
just like thousands of others around the world. And letís not forget
PT was somewhat of a science fiction writer.

Hereís a thought: While PT was in the higher worlds reading the Eck
Vidya (with poor reading skills at best) why didnít he try to read
what the actual ďremedyĒ would be, and how it would be developed, to
give us a heads up? If a person has such abilities, what is the
purpose of making predictions? To help humankind, or to show off oneís
ability? There are so many things about our history that PT failed to
see, such as the threat of Osama Bin Laden and the 9/11 catastrophe,
or the Katrina disaster, or the threat of global warming, or the
current mortgage crisis. He missed those, and instead reported
tsunamis in Hawaii that didnít pan out. And notice how broad and
general the predictions are? This tactic is a very safe method to get
things right once in awhile, since it covers almost any possibility.
If more details were provided, it makes it more difficult to shrug off
if the prediction fails. For example, if PT had given some details of
the plague, such as what the symptoms would be, who would be
vulnerable, where it would first break out, then that exposes him even
more if the prediction doesnít pan out. If it were HIV, he could have
said intervenous drug users and gays would be especially vulnerable,
but he cryptically offered no details at all. Which begs the question,
just how much can an Eck vidya reader see in the way of details?
According to some of his readings (the kind that canít ever be
verified), he can see enormous detail, even producing names, dates,
places, and even concepts and words. But with some of his readings,
they lack details and turn out to be bunk.

9. Children will start to be taught by TV via home study around the
end of the century.

Online courses exist. But thatís on the internet, which is a truly
monumental technological development of huge historical proportions
that PT failed to predict. And as I recall, there were some televised
courses on public television (UHF) as far back as the sixties. But
PTís prediction wasnít the advent of televised courses (not a hard
thing for anyone to guess), but of the advent of kids staying home to
study from TV. I seriously doubt that children will stay home and
learn exclusively from their TVís, even with televised classes,
anytime soon. Many if not most parents lack the skills to teach their
own kids. There is presently no indication that professionally trained
teachers, directly teaching kids, are going to be replaced with home
schooling using tv.

10. By the late 1980's the minerals and precious metals will have
disappeared from their usual places, forcing exploitation of the
Amazon basin, the South Pole and some part of the African jungles.

Depletion of resources has long been predicted by geologists and
environmentalists. All one
had to do was read a newspaper or science journals, and Iíve no doubt
that is exactly what PT did. And searching for new sources of raw
materials in unpopulated, remote, and inaccessible regions has long
been a subject of discussion. In fact, the search for gold and other
resources in remote lands is what the voyages of such navigators as
Columbus was all about. This is a prediction that is too easy. No
points here. Speaking of the polar caps, he failed to make what would
have been a stupendous prediction, which is the melting of the polar
ice caps due to global warming. Now_that_ would have been useful.

11. By the end of the century voting will be done by instant
electronic machines by voters in their homes, instead of at the polls.

Weíre now in 2008, and weíre far from voting in our homes. In fact,
voting fraud and errors are a big concern, and oversight of the voting
process is increasing, making it highly unlikely weíll be voting in
our homes anytime soon, since the potential for voter fraud would
increase. †And again, PT failed to predict the advent of the internet,
which could have made home voting technologically possible. He keeps
missing the real veins of gold in his ďreadings.Ē The internet is
changing our culture, and yet PT rattles on about events that havenít
happened, rather than hit the bullís eye of the amazing events that
have.

12. By the end of the century, orthodox religions will have begun to
lose ground, along with other semi-religious and occult arts such as
astrology, yoga, and many of the present day cults, although ECKANKAR
will begin to grow.

From all that I can see, yoga and other similar practices are once
again on the rise. Just about everyone I know goes to yoga classes
these days. Taijichuan and qigong are hugely popular. Cults like
Scientology and TM are still around and in the news (anybody find it
ironic that PT refers to ďcultsĒ in his prediction?). And from all
that I can see, people are still involved with Christianity, as
evidenced by the power of the Christian right over our politics.
Conservative Christian theology and ideology has become a large
political and cultural force in our society, as demonstrated by the
recent vice presidential pick of Palin, who was chosen in part to
assuage the evangelical right wing. The abortion issue, as well as
creationism, and other anti-science propaganda, such as the refusal to
admit the existence of global warming among some Christians, have run
rampant in political debate. Politicians still get elected only if
they regularly attend church and are sufficiently pious. Bush has said
his (Christian) God talks to him about foreign policy, and the public
generally seems to accept that. And Eckankar has not grown by all that
I have seen. In fact, it seems to be in decline. No, PT gets no cigar
on this one.

Overall, I'll generously give PT one clearly correct prediction (the
turn to capitalism by the Soviet Union, although, as I noted, many
political and economic pundits were hoping, praying and predicting
that would occur), 8 clearly incorrect, or ridiculous and
unsupportable, and 3 that would have been predicted by anybody reading
the daily news or using common sense, or were already supported by
predictions from science. PT commented on issues that were in some
ways, I think, rather broad and predictable, such as California NOT
falling into the ocean. So his success rate, to be very generous, is
at best 10 %, or at the very best 20%, or to put this another way, he
was 85% to 95% wrong, hardly proving him to be psychic. Would anyone
with any sanity put their faith in a person who is wrong 85% to 95 %
of the time?

What is far more telling, I think, is his apparent inability to
predict his own death, to ďpredictĒ his own successor Darwin Gross or
Harold Klemp, his failure to predict the internet (which hugely has
affected his teachings, due to spread of information revealing the
Eckankar controversy), his failure to predict David Lane, charges of
plagiarism, and other lamentable difficulties that have troubled his
legacy since his death. † Paul Twitchell could not read the Eck Vidya.

Tianyue

PS: If all this isnít enough to ponder, then hereís a repost of
something Joe wrote awhile back:

Talk To God:

Prophecy, Sex, and Liberation
[from TMOSM by D. Lane]

DEAR GURU: Things are so bad for this country that I must ask you to
talk to God about the political future. I am asking as a loyal reader
of Candid Press.
--Jan Baldheim

DEAR JAN: I didn't want to make any predictions on certain events, but
you caught me on a technical point. I did promise to answer the
questions of all Candid Press readers. I predict a bad year for my
competitor, Jean Dixon, as she will have illness and financial loss.
The war in Vietnam will increase until late in 1968 when the doves of
both sides come to the negotiating table. In 1968, Johnson and
Humphrey will run against Romney and Percy--and win again!.
I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

[In his featured column "Talk to God" for CANDID PRESS (December 10,
1967)]

† † †Perhaps the most controversial document to surface about Paul
Twitchell's hidden life is his featured column, "Talk to God," for
Candid Press in 1967. In the column, Twitchell claims to speak
directly with God about reader's personal and spiritual problems. The
founder of Eckankar always ends his words of advice (which he states
comes from God Himself) with the bold statement: I HAVE SPOKEN!

† † †The article raises some serious questions about Twitchell's
personal motives for founding Eckankar. For not only does Twitchell
make erroneous prophecies (as in the preceding quotation, Johnson
never did run for office in 1968 as Twitchell predicted, nor did his
proposed running mate, Humphrey, win the race. Nixon, not Romney as
Twitchell wrongly prophesied, finally won the Presidential Election),
but he also indulges in satirical sexual admonitions. A few graphic
examples will best illustrate the latter:

DEAR MR. TWITCHELL: My penis is too long. Can you ask God to shorten
it for me?
--BIG PETER

DEAR PETER: Why? That's what God said when He heard you wanted a
smaller sex organ. God says that we can all be happy with what He
gives unto us and you shall be happy to.
I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR GURU: I have the strange desire to wear lace panties. As I am a
normal man in every other way, I want to know if God thinks this is
bad?

--FRILLY FRED
DEAR FRILLY: He doesn't think it is good. We talked over your fetish -
for that is what you have. We both feel that your fetish is due to
lack of female companionship. You wish to secure a relationship with a
woman whose initials are P.I. Do not ask how I know nor shall you
question this advice which I now sayeth unto you: Call her and ask her
for a date. She will accept. Do not wear your panties on the date. . .
and you shall never again have a desire to wear panties. I HAVE
SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR LEARNED ONE: My penis is too small for a man of my age. Can you
talk to God and make my penis grow?
--TINY MAN

DEAR TINY: God and I talked about your penis--and God has good news
for you. He says that your penis is of average size and that you only
believe it is too small for you failed to satisfy one woman when you
were 19. Because it is of the proper size, there is no need for God
to
make it grow. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

† † †In the midst of Twitchell's incorrect prophecies and sexual
innuendoes, he also talks about Rebazar Tarzs and Eckankar to his
Candid Press readers. One can't help wondering, however, how serious
Twitchell is in presenting his bilocation philosophy with such a
humorous and mordacious context. Below are a few excerpts from the
column on Eckankar:

DEAR ECK TEACHER: After learning bilocation, I sent my sole-being
[sic] to Vietnam to visit my son who is stationed there-and he didn't
recognize me. Why?
--MRS. HELEN AYNEZ

DEAR MRS.: I was with you that day and I wanted so to allow your son
to see you--but I was hopeless to help you. You see, Eckankar is only
able to function as a path to God--and as such, it is no good if
learned for ulterior motives. You bought my book "Introduction to
Eckankar" just so you could visit your son. As entering God's universe
wasn't your goal, so the true power of Eckankar failed to work fully
for you. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR PAUL: I am only 16 and my problem may not be the type that you
normally talk to God about, but here goes. I am still a virgin! My
three best friends aren't and they always tease me. I want to wait
until I marry, but they keep kidding me. What should I do?
--M. OF MICHIGAN

DEAR M. OF MICHIGAN: If a problem worries a person, then it is
important enough for me to talk to God about. First and most important
is what Rebazar Tarzs once told me. He said: "Unto thine own self and
not beyond." My teacher meant that you must do only what you feel is
best for yourself and these are God's sentiments exactly. By the way,
God wants you to know that your three friends are still virgins. They
are merely trying to sound sophisticated and adult. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

† † †"Talk to God," probably more than any other piece of evidence,
raises the question about the genuineness of Eckankar and about the
authenticity of its founder. It is an issue which we will explore at
length in the next chapter.





A third class classified sci-fi writer Paul Twitchell predicts after
he has read
15 little small booklets of the Perry Rhodan series who was invented
1961.



Let's see... letís have some fun. Hereís a prediction: Around the
year
2300, long after we are all gone and no longer concerned with such
issues, Ronald Reagan will be cloned and return to power with his
memory intact. His first act will be to lead the world against the
aliens who took over in 2200. Klemp, who overcomes his present
illnesses will live to be at least 400 years old, and will accuse
Reagan of encroaching on alien personal property when Reagan steals a
space ship from them and leaves the planet for good, as his planetary
bid for world dominance over aliens fails. Klemp had hoped to make a
deal with the aliens in order to leave the planet himself, to make a
new life in the uninhabitable gases of Venus. Rebazar, still living
of
course, will relieve Klemp of his duties, stripping him of his
initiations, after Klemp once again stripped down to his birthday
suit
in an airport and was arrested for frightening little girls passing
by. I HAVE SPOKEN, heh, heh. Prove me wrong! (See what just a little
imagination can come up with?)












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Post Link Posted: Sun Sep 07 2008 4:40 am
Post subject: Re: Another Look at Paul Twitchell's Eck Vidya Readings
Reply to Etznab Reply with quote



On Sep 6, 8:35†pm, Tian Yue <tian...@earthlink.net> wrote:

Quote:
ECK-Vidya, The Akasa Science of Prophecy, was a small booklet first
published in 1968. The booklet includes 12 predictions made by PT.
Following are summaries of the 12 predictions, which were allegedly
made by PTís reading of the Eck Vidya. I will add a commentary after
each prediction.

1. † † †California isn't going to sink into the ocean any time soon,
contrary to the Cayce predictions, although it would happen later.

How clever. Let's see...PT predicts that another dubious prediction
won't happen. This is so laughable it hurts! Iíd say there were tens
of millions of Californians (like myself) who expressed the same
prediction by the mere fact of continuing to live in California,
ignoring completely Cayceís warning. PT was no different than the
masses of Californians who happily remained in the state. †I can get
in on this sort of prediction, too... I hereby predict that a comet
will not hit the earth next week, though my astrologist neighbor
predicts the contrary. Geologists have long established that the
tectonic plates would continue to move over eons of time, gradually
separating part of California, including Baja California, from the
North American continent. This has been public knowledge for some
time. Itís an easy assumption to make that people like Cayce and PT
would have heard of this, and that they would make predictions about
it. PTís prediction reflects the common scientific consensus of our
times.

2. Russia would turn to capitalism by the middle of the next decade
(1970's).

Russia turned to capitalism in 1992, when the Soviet Union collapsed.
PT was off by 20 years, but he did get this one right. We all have
musings that turn out to be true. There were free market economists
who predicted the Soviet Unionís demise during the cold war. They
thought communism assuredly would, or even certainly must, fail
miserably within a few years, so flawed they believed the system to
be. They thought it would fail on principle, thus affirming capitalism
as superior. Based on PTís conservative leaning politics, it is fairly
reasonable to assume PT may have been in that camp. Many in the West
fervently hoped communism would fail due to inherent flaws. So this
prediction isnít very impressive or shocking, considering the cold war
rhetoric of the times. Lots of political observers were
prognosticating the Soviet Unionís demise. Letís seeÖI hereby predict
that when Castroís brother dies, thus ending the dynasty, Cuba will
gradually return to a more democratic form of government. There is a
good chance Iíll be right.

3. † † †A tidal wave would damage Hawaii in about 1981 so badly that it
would take several years to rebuild.

This prediction is interesting in what it reveals. His predictions
were made in 1968, eight years after a large tsunami hit the Big
Island causing severe destruction, including 61 deaths and $23 million
in property damage. Another large tsunami occurred in 1946 which
flooded the downtown area of Hilo killing 159 people and causing more
than $26 million in damages. There was a small, insignificant tsunami
in 1975, in which two campers on the beach died, but with little
impact, if any, on the island. So this prediction is flat out
nonsense. And the fact is, 50 tsunamis have occurred in Hawaii since
the early 1800ís, so to predict that yet another in a long history of
frequent tsunami events would again occur is not difficult. But a
major tsunami that inflicted severe damage did not occur, so heís way
off here.

What I find revealing is his failure to predict the recent tsunami of
2004 that truly was an event of enormous magnitude. When viewed in
this context, heís not only wrong about Hawaii, but actually missed
predicting the real tsunami event that, had it been predicted, and had
he any credibility on the world stage, could have saved hundreds of
thousands of lives. So he not only screwed up that prediction, he
doubly screwed up by failing to predict the real tsunami. So much for
his ability to read the Eck Vidya.

4.America will regain her united spirit again and see a higher level
of living and wealth from about 1975-2000.

Despite this claim, as I recall there was a recession in the 1970's
during the oil embargo, and during the 1980's we had a recession,
coupled with high inflation and high interest rates, and †Reagan left
us with staggering, record breaking deficits. During Bill Clintonís
eight year term we had very good stock market returns, and low
unemployment, but that all but vanished under George Bush. The economy
has always had its ups and downs, and always will. Itís not hard to be
correct by predicting "in the future America will unite and have a
better economy" or even to say, "in the future America will be divided
and the economy will be slack." Either way one can't lose, especially
if not held rigidly to a specific time frame. PT used a long period of
25 years in his prediction, but the one consistent period of economic
upturn was the eight years under Clinton between 1992 and 2000.
Economists make predictions all the time, and sometimes they are
right, sometimes they are wrong, but in any case, their occasional
success doesn't make them any more psychic than the average person. By
the way, wages in real dollars are at an all time low. People earn
less now than they did in PTís time. The number of homeless people was
on the rise during the time PT predicted, and poverty was widespread,
but ignored by the average American. The same is true today. Some of
the gains made in the stock market during Clintonís time have been
mitigated by the current downturn. PTís prediction here is very
general and highly debatable, but at best falls short of a big
unifying, bullish period that would last for 25 years. I donít give
him any points here. If heíd wanted to make useful economic
predictions, he would have had to have been far more specific to have
made a significant prediction. I think more people would have wanted
to know about our current mortgage crisis. Too bad PT missed that in
his economic forecast. He also said nothing about poverty in America,
homelessness, decreasing wages, lack of health care, and high costs of
education, and crippling student loans. Cloud nine can be fun, but it
isnít reality.

5. The next great war will be fought not between the nations of this
planet, but between one of the other planets and Earth. This will take
place around 2000.

Whoa, Nelly. Way off the chart on this one, and more than just a tad
loony. And to add to the eyebrow raising silliness, according to some
Eckankar apologists, it may have happened on the inner planes! The
ultimate cop-out. So PTís predictions are all true, they happened on
the inner! I wonder how much of the alien stuff came from his
Scientology influence.

6. The food problem will become acute by around 1980 and the world
will turn to the US to feed them. The US will develop a synthetic food
which will give relief.

A big stretch here, in my view. The U.S. has not come up with a
synthetic food on any mass scale, and it certainly hasnít found a
synthetic food to feed the world. He is wrong in this prediction. By
the way, genetically altered food is not synthetic, and some believe
this development will be looked upon someday as one of the worst
environmental disasters in history as the full consequences take
effect. Europeans are correct in rejecting this technology. Sounds as
though PT had been reading too many science fiction novels. Soylent
Green, anyone?
When PT wrote this (1968) there was a very popular book on the market
that predicted mass world starvation due to the sharply increasing
population. As Wikipedia states, ďThe Population Bomb (1968) is a book
written by Paul R. Ehrlich. A best-selling work, it predicted disaster
for humanity due to overpopulation and the "population explosion". The
book predicted that "in the 1970s and 1980s hundreds of millions of
people will starve to death", that nothing can be done to avoid mass
famine greater than any in the history, and radical action is needed
to limit the overpopulation. History proved Ehrlich wrong, as the mass
starvations predicted for the 1970s and 1980s never occurred.Ē

The bookís warning was very alarming and widely discussed in the
media. But now, world starvation truly is occurring, caused in part by
converting corn crops to ethanol production, thus reducing the food
supply and raising the cost of food, and also by the oil prices, which
affect distribution and even the cost of petroleum based fertilizers.
But still no synthetic food has been produced by the US to save the
world, and in fact, the US may be exacerbating the problem rather than
helping.

It isnít at all a stretch to surmise that a known plagiarist would
read that book (which came out in the same year PT made this
ďpredictionĒ) and convert the bookís thesis into an Eck vidya
prediction. †This isnít plagiary, but PT did opportunistically glean
material from near and far to use in his own writings. Iím shaking my
head with dismay. In any case, he was wrong, as was the author of the
book.

7. The shifting of the polar caps will cause an upset in the world
around 2200.

Quite clever here. Anyone can make a prediction that is so far in the
future that no one will live long enough to see.

Let's see... letís have some fun. Hereís a prediction: Around the year
2300, long after we are all gone and no longer concerned with such
issues, Ronald Reagan will be cloned and return to power with his
memory intact. His first act will be to lead the world against the
aliens who took over in 2200. Klemp, who overcomes his present
illnesses will live to be at least 400 years old, and will accuse
Reagan of encroaching on alien personal property when Reagan steals a
space ship from them and leaves the planet for good, as his planetary
bid for world dominance over aliens fails. Klemp had hoped to make a
deal with the aliens in order to leave the planet himself, to make a
new life in the uninhabitable gases of Venus. Rebazar, still living of
course, will relieve Klemp of his duties, stripping him of his
initiations, after Klemp once again stripped down to his birthday suit
in an airport and was arrested for frightening little girls passing
by. I HAVE SPOKEN, heh, heh. Prove me wrong! (See what just a little
imagination can come up with?)

8. A new type of virus will sweep the world in 1975, which will be so
new to scientists that it will take time to develop a remedy.

In one PT publication I recall his predicted virus being a "moon
plague." This has not been proven to have occurred. The fact is there
are many rare viruses that experts have long predicted will eventually
mutate into a form that becomes dangerous to humans, and such viruses
have long been the subject of serious discussion by many besides PT.
The Center for Disease Control has been deeply concerned about this
for ages. One that is really scary is the Ebola virus. Another is the
common flu virus (such as the Spanish Flu that killed millions), like
the bird flu or possibly SARS. Most expert immunologists figure human
kind is due for a life-threatening virus or bacterium to become
epidemic anytime now, especially since weakened immune systems from
overuse of antibiotics and poor nutrition are commonplace. We canít
ignore the emergence of HIV, which is a serious problem worldwide,
along with the resurgence of antibiotic resistant tuberculosis and
news strains of malaria. MRSA looms as well. This is not a difficult
prediction to make. Anyway, considering that plagues have always
struck every so often in our history, I hereby predict with complete
confidence that a terrible virus will sweep the world, and scientists
will not have a remedy. The only thing I canít do is predict exactly
when that will happen. PT, not surprisingly, could do no better.

But a remedy? There are no outright ďcuresĒ for viruses in the world
of biochemical medicine. There are vaccines used to prevent viral
infections, and antiviral drugs to relieve symptoms and pain, but no
outright true "remedies" or cures. Itís still up to the patientís
immune system to do the bulk of the work when a virus is involved. In
any case, HIV, malaria and tuberculosis are still killing millions.

PT wasnít the only one thinking about alien viruses during this
period. Itís interesting that a novel about an alien virus appeared
around the time PTís booklet was published, which reflects the
interests of American culture of the time. The Andromeda Strain
(1969), by Michael Crichton, is a science fiction novel depicting the
efforts of a team of scientists investigating a deadly alien
microorganism which clots human blood. In the novel, scientists
scramble to find a vaccine. Maybe Crichton was reading the Eck Vidya?
Either that or they both were reflecting the imaginings of the times,
just like thousands of others around the world. And letís not forget
PT was somewhat of a science fiction writer.

Hereís a thought: While PT was in the higher worlds reading the Eck
Vidya (with poor reading skills at best) why didnít he try to read
what the actual ďremedyĒ would be, and how it would be developed, to
give us a heads up? If a person has such abilities, what is the
purpose of making predictions? To help humankind, or to show off oneís
ability? There are so many things about our history that PT failed to
see, such as the threat of Osama Bin Laden and the 9/11 catastrophe,
or the Katrina disaster, or the threat of global warming, or the
current mortgage crisis. He missed those, and instead reported
tsunamis in Hawaii that didnít pan out. And notice how broad and
general the predictions are? This tactic is a very safe method to get
things right once in awhile, since it covers almost any possibility.
If more details were provided, it makes it more difficult to shrug off
if the prediction fails. For example, if PT had given some details of
the plague, such as what the symptoms would be, who would be
vulnerable, where it would first break out, then that exposes him even
more if the prediction doesnít pan out. If it were HIV, he could have
said intervenous drug users and gays would be especially vulnerable,
but he cryptically offered no details at all. Which begs the question,
just how much can an Eck vidya reader see in the way of details?
According to some of his readings (the kind that canít ever be
verified), he can see enormous detail, even producing names, dates,
places, and even concepts and words. But with some of his readings,
they lack details and turn out to be bunk.

9. Children will start to be taught by TV via home study around the
end of the century.

Online courses exist. But thatís on the internet, which is a truly
monumental technological development of huge historical proportions
that PT failed to predict. And as I recall, there were some televised
courses on public television (UHF) as far back as the sixties. But
PTís prediction wasnít the advent of televised courses (not a hard
thing for anyone to guess), but of the advent of kids staying home to
study from TV. I seriously doubt that children will stay home and
learn exclusively from their TVís, even with televised classes,
anytime soon. Many if not most parents lack the skills to teach their
own kids. There is presently no indication that professionally trained
teachers, directly teaching kids, are going to be replaced with home
schooling using tv.

10. By the late 1980's the minerals and precious metals will have
disappeared from their usual places, forcing exploitation of the
Amazon basin, the South Pole and some part of the African jungles.

Depletion of resources has long been predicted by geologists and
environmentalists. All one
had to do was read a newspaper or science journals, and Iíve no doubt
that is exactly what PT did. And searching for new sources of raw
materials in unpopulated, remote, and inaccessible regions has long
been a subject of discussion. In fact, the search for gold and other
resources in remote lands is what the voyages of such navigators as
Columbus was all about. This is a prediction that is too easy. No
points here. Speaking of the polar caps, he failed to make what would
have been a stupendous prediction, which is the melting of the polar
ice caps due to global warming. Now_that_ would have been useful.

11. By the end of the century voting will be done by instant
electronic machines by voters in their homes, instead of at the polls.

Weíre now in 2008, and weíre far from voting in our homes. In fact,
voting fraud and errors are a big concern, and oversight of the voting
process is increasing, making it highly unlikely weíll be voting in
our homes anytime soon, since the potential for voter fraud would
increase. †And again, PT failed to predict the advent of the internet,
which could have made home voting technologically possible. He keeps
missing the real veins of gold in his ďreadings.Ē The internet is
changing our culture, and yet PT rattles on about events that havenít
happened, rather than hit the bullís eye of the amazing events that
have.

12. By the end of the century, orthodox religions will have begun to
lose ground, along with other semi-religious and occult arts such as
astrology, yoga, and many of the present day cults, although ECKANKAR
will begin to grow.

From all that I can see, yoga and other similar practices are once
again on the rise. Just about everyone I know goes to yoga classes
these days. Taijichuan and qigong are hugely popular. Cults like
Scientology and TM are still around and in the news (anybody find it
ironic that PT refers to ďcultsĒ in his prediction?). And from all
that I can see, people are still involved with Christianity, as
evidenced by the power of the Christian right over our politics.
Conservative Christian theology and ideology has become a large
political and cultural force in our society, as demonstrated by the
recent vice presidential pick of Palin, who was chosen in part to
assuage the evangelical right wing. The abortion issue, as well as
creationism, and other anti-science propaganda, such as the refusal to
admit the existence of global warming among some Christians, have run
rampant in political debate. Politicians still get elected only if
they regularly attend church and are sufficiently pious. Bush has said
his (Christian) God talks to him about foreign policy, and the public
generally seems to accept that. And Eckankar has not grown by all that
I have seen. In fact, it seems to be in decline. No, PT gets no cigar
on this one.

Overall, I'll generously give PT one clearly correct prediction (the
turn to capitalism by the Soviet Union, although, as I noted, many
political and economic pundits were hoping, praying and predicting
that would occur), 8 clearly incorrect, or ridiculous and
unsupportable, and 3 that would have been predicted by anybody reading
the daily news or using common sense, or were already supported by
predictions from science. PT commented on issues that were in some
ways, I think, rather broad and predictable, such as California NOT
falling into the ocean. So his success rate, to be very generous, is
at best 10 %, or at the very best 20%, or to put this another way, he
was 85% to 95% wrong, hardly proving him to be psychic. Would anyone
with any sanity put their faith in a person who is wrong 85% to 95 %
of the time?

What is far more telling, I think, is his apparent inability to
predict his own death, to ďpredictĒ his own successor Darwin Gross or
Harold Klemp, his failure to predict the internet (which hugely has
affected his teachings, due to spread of information revealing the
Eckankar controversy), his failure to predict David Lane, charges of
plagiarism, and other lamentable difficulties that have troubled his
legacy since his death. † Paul Twitchell could not read the Eck Vidya.

Tianyue

PS: If all this isnít enough to ponder, then hereís a repost of
something Joe wrote awhile back:

Talk To God:

Prophecy, Sex, and Liberation
[from TMOSM by D. Lane]

DEAR GURU: Things are so bad for this country that I must ask you to
talk to God about the political future. I am asking as a loyal reader
of Candid Press.
--Jan Baldheim

DEAR JAN: I didn't want to make any predictions on certain events, but
you caught me on a technical point. I did promise to answer the
questions of all Candid Press readers. I predict a bad year for my
competitor, Jean Dixon, as she will have illness and financial loss.
The war in Vietnam will increase until late in 1968 when the doves of
both sides come to the negotiating table. In 1968, Johnson and
Humphrey will run against Romney and Percy--and win again!.
I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

[In his featured column "Talk to God" for CANDID PRESS (December 10,
1967)]

† † †Perhaps the most controversial document to surface about Paul
Twitchell's hidden life is his featured column, "Talk to God," for
Candid Press in 1967. In the column, Twitchell claims to speak
directly with God about reader's personal and spiritual problems. The
founder of Eckankar always ends his words of advice (which he states
comes from God Himself) with the bold statement: I HAVE SPOKEN!

† † †The article raises some serious questions about Twitchell's
personal motives for founding Eckankar. For not only does Twitchell
make erroneous prophecies (as in the preceding quotation, Johnson
never did run for office in 1968 as Twitchell predicted, nor did his
proposed running mate, Humphrey, win the race. Nixon, not Romney as
Twitchell wrongly prophesied, finally won the Presidential Election),
but he also indulges in satirical sexual admonitions. A few graphic
examples will best illustrate the latter:

DEAR MR. TWITCHELL: My penis is too long. Can you ask God to shorten
it for me?
--BIG PETER

DEAR PETER: Why? That's what God said when He heard you wanted a
smaller sex organ. God says that we can all be happy with what He
gives unto us and you shall be happy to.
I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR GURU: I have the strange desire to wear lace panties. As I am a
normal man in every other way, I want to know if God thinks this is
bad?

--FRILLY FRED
DEAR FRILLY: He doesn't think it is good. We talked over your fetish -
for that is what you have. We both feel that your fetish is due to
lack of female companionship. You wish to secure a relationship with a
woman whose initials are P.I. Do not ask how I know nor shall you
question this advice which I now sayeth unto you: Call her and ask her
for a date. She will accept. Do not wear your panties on the date. . .
and you shall never again have a desire to wear panties. I HAVE
SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR LEARNED ONE: My penis is too small for a man of my age. Can you
talk to God and make my penis grow?
--TINY MAN

DEAR TINY: God and I talked about your penis--and God has good news
for you. He says that your penis is of average size and that you only
believe it is too small for you failed to satisfy one woman when you
were 19. Because it is of the proper size, there is no need for God
to
make it grow. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

† † †In the midst of Twitchell's incorrect prophecies and sexual
innuendoes, he also talks about Rebazar Tarzs and Eckankar to his
Candid Press readers. One can't help wondering, however, how serious
Twitchell is in presenting his bilocation philosophy with such a
humorous and mordacious context. Below are a few excerpts from the
column on Eckankar:

DEAR ECK TEACHER: After learning bilocation, I sent my sole-being
[sic] to Vietnam to visit my son who is stationed there-and he didn't
recognize me. Why?
--MRS. HELEN AYNEZ

DEAR MRS.: I was with you that day and I wanted so to allow your son
to see you--but I was hopeless to help you. You see, Eckankar is only
able to function as a path to God--and as such, it is no good if
learned for ulterior motives. You bought my book "Introduction to
Eckankar" just so you could visit your son. As entering God's universe
wasn't your goal, so the true power of Eckankar failed to work fully
for you. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR PAUL: I am only 16 and my problem may not be the type that you
normally talk to God about, but here goes. I am still a virgin! My
three best friends aren't and they always tease me. I want to wait
until I marry, but they keep kidding me. What should I do?
--M. OF MICHIGAN

DEAR M. OF MICHIGAN: If a problem worries a person, then it is
important enough for me to talk to God about. First and most important
is what Rebazar Tarzs once told me. He said: "Unto thine own self and
not beyond." My teacher meant that you must do only what you feel is
best for yourself and these are God's sentiments exactly. By the way,
God wants you to know that your three friends are still virgins. They
are merely trying to sound sophisticated and adult. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

† † †"Talk to God," probably more than any other piece of evidence,
raises the question about the genuineness of Eckankar and about the
authenticity of its founder. It is an issue which we will explore at
length in the next chapter.


Tianyue,

Seriously, I find the second part very telling. Faced with
ridiculous questions Paul was prepared to answer in kind.

I find this telling on account of what some people expect
from a "Godman". I find it telling that Paul Twitchell did not
have all the answers - as many people might imagine that
"God" naturally would.

Really I'm being serious here. No kidding.

*********

I think it shows something especially telling when a story
is told that Paul Twitchell took poison when he knew it would
harm him ... like Buddha when he ate the tainted rice!

Why was the story told like that? Because with Paul Twit-
chell's state of consciousness there is no way he could be
poisoned? I listened to the audiotape from 1970 when Paul
talked about this incident. If I'm not mistaken he said that it
knocked him out for about three days! And he didn't sound
to me like someone who knew beforehand that someone
put poison in his juice. I think it's fair to say he might have
had a "feeling" perhaps, that something might not be right.
I doubt though that he knew beforehand how it would later
impact his life. Turning him white and rendering him unable
to walk up his own steps for a time.

Etznab












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Post Link Posted: Sun Sep 07 2008 6:42 am
Post subject: Re: Another Look at Paul Twitchell's Eck Vidya Readings
Reply to Tian Yue Reply with quote



On Sep 7, 7:40†am, Etznab <etz...@aol.com> wrote:

Quote:
On Sep 6, 8:35†pm, Tian Yue <tian...@earthlink.net> wrote:

ECK-Vidya, The Akasa Science of Prophecy, was a small booklet first
published in 1968. The booklet includes 12 predictions made by PT.
Following are summaries of the 12 predictions, which were allegedly
made by PTís reading of the Eck Vidya. I will add a commentary after
each prediction.

1. † † †California isn't going to sink into the ocean any time soon,
contrary to the Cayce predictions, although it would happen later.

How clever. Let's see...PT predicts that another dubious prediction
won't happen. This is so laughable it hurts! Iíd say there were tens
of millions of Californians (like myself) who expressed the same
prediction by the mere fact of continuing to live in California,
ignoring completely Cayceís warning. PT was no different than the
masses of Californians who happily remained in the state. †I can get
in on this sort of prediction, too... I hereby predict that a comet
will not hit the earth next week, though my astrologist neighbor
predicts the contrary. Geologists have long established that the
tectonic plates would continue to move over eons of time, gradually
separating part of California, including Baja California, from the
North American continent. This has been public knowledge for some
time. Itís an easy assumption to make that people like Cayce and PT
would have heard of this, and that they would make predictions about
it. PTís prediction reflects the common scientific consensus of our
times.

2. Russia would turn to capitalism by the middle of the next decade
(1970's).

Russia turned to capitalism in 1992, when the Soviet Union collapsed.
PT was off by 20 years, but he did get this one right. We all have
musings that turn out to be true. There were free market economists
who predicted the Soviet Unionís demise during the cold war. They
thought communism assuredly would, or even certainly must, fail
miserably within a few years, so flawed they believed the system to
be. They thought it would fail on principle, thus affirming capitalism
as superior. Based on PTís conservative leaning politics, it is fairly
reasonable to assume PT may have been in that camp. Many in the West
fervently hoped communism would fail due to inherent flaws. So this
prediction isnít very impressive or shocking, considering the cold war
rhetoric of the times. Lots of political observers were
prognosticating the Soviet Unionís demise. Letís seeÖI hereby predict
that when Castroís brother dies, thus ending the dynasty, Cuba will
gradually return to a more democratic form of government. There is a
good chance Iíll be right.

3. † † †A tidal wave would damage Hawaii in about 1981 so badly that it
would take several years to rebuild.

This prediction is interesting in what it reveals. His predictions
were made in 1968, eight years after a large tsunami hit the Big
Island causing severe destruction, including 61 deaths and $23 million
in property damage. Another large tsunami occurred in 1946 which
flooded the downtown area of Hilo killing 159 people and causing more
than $26 million in damages. There was a small, insignificant tsunami
in 1975, in which two campers on the beach died, but with little
impact, if any, on the island. So this prediction is flat out
nonsense. And the fact is, 50 tsunamis have occurred in Hawaii since
the early 1800ís, so to predict that yet another in a long history of
frequent tsunami events would again occur is not difficult. But a
major tsunami that inflicted severe damage did not occur, so heís way
off here.

What I find revealing is his failure to predict the recent tsunami of
2004 that truly was an event of enormous magnitude. When viewed in
this context, heís not only wrong about Hawaii, but actually missed
predicting the real tsunami event that, had it been predicted, and had
he any credibility on the world stage, could have saved hundreds of
thousands of lives. So he not only screwed up that prediction, he
doubly screwed up by failing to predict the real tsunami. So much for
his ability to read the Eck Vidya.

4.America will regain her united spirit again and see a higher level
of living and wealth from about 1975-2000.

Despite this claim, as I recall there was a recession in the 1970's
during the oil embargo, and during the 1980's we had a recession,
coupled with high inflation and high interest rates, and †Reagan left
us with staggering, record breaking deficits. During Bill Clintonís
eight year term we had very good stock market returns, and low
unemployment, but that all but vanished under George Bush. The economy
has always had its ups and downs, and always will. Itís not hard to be
correct by predicting "in the future America will unite and have a
better economy" or even to say, "in the future America will be divided
and the economy will be slack." Either way one can't lose, especially
if not held rigidly to a specific time frame. PT used a long period of
25 years in his prediction, but the one consistent period of economic
upturn was the eight years under Clinton between 1992 and 2000.
Economists make predictions all the time, and sometimes they are
right, sometimes they are wrong, but in any case, their occasional
success doesn't make them any more psychic than the average person. By
the way, wages in real dollars are at an all time low. People earn
less now than they did in PTís time. The number of homeless people was
on the rise during the time PT predicted, and poverty was widespread,
but ignored by the average American. The same is true today. Some of
the gains made in the stock market during Clintonís time have been
mitigated by the current downturn. PTís prediction here is very
general and highly debatable, but at best falls short of a big
unifying, bullish period that would last for 25 years. I donít give
him any points here. If heíd wanted to make useful economic
predictions, he would have had to have been far more specific to have
made a significant prediction. I think more people would have wanted
to know about our current mortgage crisis. Too bad PT missed that in
his economic forecast. He also said nothing about poverty in America,
homelessness, decreasing wages, lack of health care, and high costs of
education, and crippling student loans. Cloud nine can be fun, but it
isnít reality.

5. The next great war will be fought not between the nations of this
planet, but between one of the other planets and Earth. This will take
place around 2000.

Whoa, Nelly. Way off the chart on this one, and more than just a tad
loony. And to add to the eyebrow raising silliness, according to some
Eckankar apologists, it may have happened on the inner planes! The
ultimate cop-out. So PTís predictions are all true, they happened on
the inner! I wonder how much of the alien stuff came from his
Scientology influence.

6. The food problem will become acute by around 1980 and the world
will turn to the US to feed them. The US will develop a synthetic food
which will give relief.

A big stretch here, in my view. The U.S. has not come up with a
synthetic food on any mass scale, and it certainly hasnít found a
synthetic food to feed the world. He is wrong in this prediction. By
the way, genetically altered food is not synthetic, and some believe
this development will be looked upon someday as one of the worst
environmental disasters in history as the full consequences take
effect. Europeans are correct in rejecting this technology. Sounds as
though PT had been reading too many science fiction novels. Soylent
Green, anyone?
When PT wrote this (1968) there was a very popular book on the market
that predicted mass world starvation due to the sharply increasing
population. As Wikipedia states, ďThe Population Bomb (1968) is a book
written by Paul R. Ehrlich. A best-selling work, it predicted disaster
for humanity due to overpopulation and the "population explosion". The
book predicted that "in the 1970s and 1980s hundreds of millions of
people will starve to death", that nothing can be done to avoid mass
famine greater than any in the history, and radical action is needed
to limit the overpopulation. History proved Ehrlich wrong, as the mass
starvations predicted for the 1970s and 1980s never occurred.Ē

The bookís warning was very alarming and widely discussed in the
media. But now, world starvation truly is occurring, caused in part by
converting corn crops to ethanol production, thus reducing the food
supply and raising the cost of food, and also by the oil prices, which
affect distribution and even the cost of petroleum based fertilizers.
But still no synthetic food has been produced by the US to save the
world, and in fact, the US may be exacerbating the problem rather than
helping.

It isnít at all a stretch to surmise that a known plagiarist would
read that book (which came out in the same year PT made this
ďpredictionĒ) and convert the bookís thesis into an Eck vidya
prediction. †This isnít plagiary, but PT did opportunistically glean
material from near and far to use in his own writings. Iím shaking my
head with dismay. In any case, he was wrong, as was the author of the
book.

7. The shifting of the polar caps will cause an upset in the world
around 2200.

Quite clever here. Anyone can make a prediction that is so far in the
future that no one will live long enough to see.

Let's see... letís have some fun. Hereís a prediction: Around the year
2300, long after we are all gone and no longer concerned with such
issues, Ronald Reagan will be cloned and return to power with his
memory intact. His first act will be to lead the world against the
aliens who took over in 2200. Klemp, who overcomes his present
illnesses will live to be at least 400 years old, and will accuse
Reagan of encroaching on alien personal property when Reagan steals a
space ship from them and leaves the planet for good, as his planetary
bid for world dominance over aliens fails. Klemp had hoped to make a
deal with the aliens in order to leave the planet himself, to make a
new life in the uninhabitable gases of Venus. Rebazar, still living of
course, will relieve Klemp of his duties, stripping him of his
initiations, after Klemp once again stripped down to his birthday suit
in an airport and was arrested for frightening little girls passing
by. I HAVE SPOKEN, heh, heh. Prove me wrong! (See what just a little
imagination can come up with?)

8. A new type of virus will sweep the world in 1975, which will be so
new to scientists that it will take time to develop a remedy.

In one PT publication I recall his predicted virus being a "moon
plague." This has not been proven to have occurred. The fact is there
are many rare viruses that experts have long predicted will eventually
mutate into a form that becomes dangerous to humans, and such viruses
have long been the subject of serious discussion by many besides PT.
The Center for Disease Control has been deeply concerned about this
for ages. One that is really scary is the Ebola virus. Another is the
common flu virus (such as the Spanish Flu that killed millions), like
the bird flu or possibly SARS. Most expert immunologists figure human
kind is due for a life-threatening virus or bacterium to become
epidemic anytime now, especially since weakened immune systems from
overuse of antibiotics and poor nutrition are commonplace. We canít
ignore the emergence of HIV, which is a serious problem worldwide,
along with the resurgence of antibiotic resistant tuberculosis and
news strains of malaria. MRSA looms as well. This is not a difficult
prediction to make. Anyway, considering that plagues have always
struck every so often in our history, I hereby predict with complete
confidence that a terrible virus will sweep the world, and scientists
will not have a remedy. The only thing I canít do is predict exactly
when that will happen. PT, not surprisingly, could do no better.

But a remedy? There are no outright ďcuresĒ for viruses in the world
of biochemical medicine. There are vaccines used to prevent viral
infections, and antiviral drugs to relieve symptoms and pain, but no
outright true "remedies" or cures. Itís still up to the patientís
immune system to do the bulk of the work when a virus is involved. In
any case, HIV, malaria and tuberculosis are still killing millions.

PT wasnít the only one thinking about alien viruses during this
period. Itís interesting that a novel about an alien virus appeared
around the time PTís booklet was published, which reflects the
interests of American culture of the time. The Andromeda Strain
(1969), by Michael Crichton, is a science fiction novel depicting the
efforts of a team of scientists investigating a deadly alien
microorganism which clots human blood. In the novel, scientists
scramble to find a vaccine. Maybe Crichton was reading the Eck Vidya?
Either that or they both were reflecting the imaginings of the times,
just like thousands of others around the world. And letís not forget
PT was somewhat of a science fiction writer.

Hereís a thought: While PT was in the higher worlds reading the Eck
Vidya (with poor reading skills at best) why didnít he try to read
what the actual ďremedyĒ would be, and how it would be developed, to
give us a heads up? If a person has such abilities, what is the
purpose of making predictions? To help humankind, or to show off oneís
ability? There are so many things about our history that PT failed to
see, such as the threat of Osama Bin Laden and the 9/11 catastrophe,
or the Katrina disaster, or the threat of global warming, or the
current mortgage crisis. He missed those, and instead reported
tsunamis in Hawaii that didnít pan out. And notice how broad and
general the predictions are? This tactic is a very safe method to get
things right once in awhile, since it covers almost any possibility.
If more details were provided, it makes it more difficult to shrug off
if the prediction fails. For example, if PT had given some details of
the plague, such as what the symptoms would be, who would be
vulnerable, where it would first break out, then that exposes him even
more if the prediction doesnít pan out. If it were HIV, he could have
said intervenous drug users and gays would be especially vulnerable,
but he cryptically offered no details at all. Which begs the question,
just how much can an Eck vidya reader see in the way of details?
According to some of his readings (the kind that canít ever be
verified), he can see enormous detail, even producing names, dates,
places, and even concepts and words. But with some of his readings,
they lack details and turn out to be bunk.

9. Children will start to be taught by TV via home study around the
end of the century.

Online courses exist. But thatís on the internet, which is a truly
monumental technological development of huge historical proportions
that PT failed to predict. And as I recall, there were some televised
courses on public television (UHF) as far back as the sixties. But
PTís prediction wasnít the advent of televised courses (not a hard
thing for anyone to guess), but of the advent of kids staying home to
study from TV. I seriously doubt that children will stay home and
learn exclusively from their TVís, even with televised classes,
anytime soon. Many if not most parents lack the skills to teach their
own kids. There is presently no indication that professionally trained
teachers, directly teaching kids, are going to be replaced with home
schooling using tv.

10. By the late 1980's the minerals and precious metals will have
disappeared from their usual places, forcing exploitation of the
Amazon basin, the South Pole and some part of the African jungles.

Depletion of resources has long been predicted by geologists and
environmentalists. All one
had to do was read a newspaper or science journals, and Iíve no doubt
that is exactly what PT did. And searching for new sources of raw
materials in unpopulated, remote, and inaccessible regions has long
been a subject of discussion. In fact, the search for gold and other
resources in remote lands is what the voyages of such navigators as
Columbus was all about. This is a prediction that is too easy. No
points here. Speaking of the polar caps, he failed to make what would
have been a stupendous prediction, which is the melting of the polar
ice caps due to global warming. Now_that_ would have been useful.

11. By the end of the century voting will be done by instant
electronic machines by voters in their homes, instead of at the polls.

Weíre now in 2008, and weíre far from voting in our homes. In fact,
voting fraud and errors are a big concern, and oversight of the voting
process is increasing, making it highly unlikely weíll be voting in
our homes anytime soon, since the potential for voter fraud would
increase. †And again, PT failed to predict the advent of the internet,
which could have made home voting technologically possible. He keeps
missing the real veins of gold in his ďreadings.Ē The internet is
changing our culture, and yet PT rattles on about events that havenít
happened, rather than hit the bullís eye of the amazing events that
have.

12. By the end of the century, orthodox religions will have begun to
lose ground, along with other semi-religious and occult arts such as
astrology, yoga, and many of the present day cults, although ECKANKAR
will begin to grow.

From all that I can see, yoga and other similar practices are once
again on the rise. Just about everyone I know goes to yoga classes
these days. Taijichuan and qigong are hugely popular. Cults like
Scientology and TM are still around and in the news (anybody find it
ironic that PT refers to ďcultsĒ in his prediction?). And from all
that I can see, people are still involved with Christianity, as
evidenced by the power of the Christian right over our politics.
Conservative Christian theology and ideology has become a large
political and cultural force in our society, as demonstrated by the
recent vice presidential pick of Palin, who was chosen in part to
assuage the evangelical right wing. The abortion issue, as well as
creationism, and other anti-science propaganda, such as the refusal to
admit the existence of global warming among some Christians, have run
rampant in political debate. Politicians still get elected only if
they regularly attend church and are sufficiently pious. Bush has said
his (Christian) God talks to him about foreign policy, and the public
generally seems to accept that. And Eckankar has not grown by all that
I have seen. In fact, it seems to be in decline. No, PT gets no cigar
on this one.

Overall, I'll generously give PT one clearly correct prediction (the
turn to capitalism by the Soviet Union, although, as I noted, many
political and economic pundits were hoping, praying and predicting
that would occur), 8 clearly incorrect, or ridiculous and
unsupportable, and 3 that would have been predicted by anybody reading
the daily news or using common sense, or were already supported by
predictions from science. PT commented on issues that were in some
ways, I think, rather broad and predictable, such as California NOT
falling into the ocean. So his success rate, to be very generous, is
at best 10 %, or at the very best 20%, or to put this another way, he
was 85% to 95% wrong, hardly proving him to be psychic. Would anyone
with any sanity put their faith in a person who is wrong 85% to 95 %
of the time?

What is far more telling, I think, is his apparent inability to
predict his own death, to ďpredictĒ his own successor Darwin Gross or
Harold Klemp, his failure to predict the internet (which hugely has
affected his teachings, due to spread of information revealing the
Eckankar controversy), his failure to predict David Lane, charges of
plagiarism, and other lamentable difficulties that have troubled his
legacy since his death. † Paul Twitchell could not read the Eck Vidya..

Tianyue

PS: If all this isnít enough to ponder, then hereís a repost of
something Joe wrote awhile back:

Talk To God:

Prophecy, Sex, and Liberation
[from TMOSM by D. Lane]

DEAR GURU: Things are so bad for this country that I must ask you to
talk to God about the political future. I am asking as a loyal reader
of Candid Press.
--Jan Baldheim

DEAR JAN: I didn't want to make any predictions on certain events, but
you caught me on a technical point. I did promise to answer the
questions of all Candid Press readers. I predict a bad year for my
competitor, Jean Dixon, as she will have illness and financial loss.
The war in Vietnam will increase until late in 1968 when the doves of
both sides come to the negotiating table. In 1968, Johnson and
Humphrey will run against Romney and Percy--and win again!.
I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

[In his featured column "Talk to God" for CANDID PRESS (December 10,
1967)]

† † †Perhaps the most controversial document to surface about Paul
Twitchell's hidden life is his featured column, "Talk to God," for
Candid Press in 1967. In the column, Twitchell claims to speak
directly with God about reader's personal and spiritual problems. The
founder of Eckankar always ends his words of advice (which he states
comes from God Himself) with the bold statement: I HAVE SPOKEN!

† † †The article raises some serious questions about Twitchell's
personal motives for founding Eckankar. For not only does Twitchell
make erroneous prophecies (as in the preceding quotation, Johnson
never did run for office in 1968 as Twitchell predicted, nor did his
proposed running mate, Humphrey, win the race. Nixon, not Romney as
Twitchell wrongly prophesied, finally won the Presidential Election),
but he also indulges in satirical sexual admonitions. A few graphic
examples will best illustrate the latter:

DEAR MR. TWITCHELL: My penis is too long. Can you ask God to shorten
it for me?
--BIG PETER

DEAR PETER: Why? That's what God said when He heard you wanted a
smaller sex organ. God says that we can all be happy with what He
gives unto us and you shall be happy to.
I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR GURU: I have the strange desire to wear lace panties. As I am a
normal man in every other way, I want to know if God thinks this is
bad?

--FRILLY FRED
DEAR FRILLY: He doesn't think it is good. We talked over your fetish -
for that is what you have. We both feel that your fetish is due to
lack of female companionship. You wish to secure a relationship with a
woman whose initials are P.I. Do not ask how I know nor shall you
question this advice which I now sayeth unto you: Call her and ask her
for a date. She will accept. Do not wear your panties on the date. . .
and you shall never again have a desire to wear panties. I HAVE
SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR LEARNED ONE: My penis is too small for a man of my age. Can you
talk to God and make my penis grow?
--TINY MAN

DEAR TINY: God and I talked about your penis--and God has good news
for you. He says that your penis is of average size and that you only
believe it is too small for you failed to satisfy one woman when you
were 19. Because it is of the proper size, there is no need for God
to
make it grow. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

† † †In the midst of Twitchell's incorrect prophecies and sexual
innuendoes, he also talks about Rebazar Tarzs and Eckankar to his
Candid Press readers. One can't help wondering, however, how serious
Twitchell is in presenting his bilocation philosophy with such a
humorous and mordacious context. Below are a few excerpts from the
column on Eckankar:

DEAR ECK TEACHER: After learning bilocation, I sent my sole-being
[sic] to Vietnam to visit my son who is stationed there-and he didn't
recognize me. Why?
--MRS. HELEN AYNEZ

DEAR MRS.: I was with you that day and I wanted so to allow your son
to see you--but I was hopeless to help you. You see, Eckankar is only
able to function as a path to God--and as such, it is no good if
learned for ulterior motives. You bought my book "Introduction to
Eckankar" just so you could visit your son. As entering God's universe
wasn't your goal, so the true power of Eckankar failed to work fully
for you. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR PAUL: I am only 16 and my problem may not be the type that you
normally talk to God about, but here goes. I am still a virgin! My
three best friends aren't and they always tease me. I want to wait
until I marry, but they keep kidding me. What should I do?
--M. OF MICHIGAN

DEAR M. OF MICHIGAN: If a problem worries a person, then it is
important enough for me to talk to God about. First and most important
is what Rebazar Tarzs once told me. He said: "Unto thine own self and
not beyond." My teacher meant that you must do only what you feel is
best for yourself and these are God's sentiments exactly. By the way,
God wants you to know that your three friends are still virgins. They
are merely trying to sound sophisticated and adult. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

† † †"Talk to God," probably more than any other piece of evidence,
raises the question about the genuineness of Eckankar and about the
authenticity of its founder. It is an issue which we will explore at
length in the next chapter.

Tianyue,

† †Seriously, I find the second part very telling. Faced with
ridiculous questions Paul was prepared to answer in kind.

† †I find this telling on account of what some people expect
from a "Godman". I find it telling that Paul Twitchell did not
have all the answers - as many people might imagine that
"God" naturally would.

† †Really I'm being serious here. No kidding.

*********

† †I think it shows something especially telling when a story
is told that Paul Twitchell took poison when he knew it would
harm him ... like Buddha when he ate the tainted rice!

† †Why was the story told like that? Because with Paul Twit-
chell's state of consciousness there is no way he could be
poisoned? I listened to the audiotape from 1970 when Paul
talked about this incident. If I'm not mistaken he said that it
knocked him out for about three days! And he didn't sound
to me like someone who knew beforehand that someone
put poison in his juice. I think it's fair to say he might have
had a "feeling" perhaps, that something might not be right.
I doubt though that he knew beforehand how it would later
impact his life. Turning him white and rendering him unable
to walk up his own steps for a time.

Etznab



What I find revealing in his personal readings for indiviudals is the
detail he provides, that he didn't provide in the other readings. He
can tell us the initials of a person to be contacted, who will
telephone whom and at what time, but can't tell us accurately anything
regarding his predictions.

So, I expect the rationalizations will start coming in. It will be
interesting to see what sort of responses people give to PT's failed
predictions. A note to the observant readership: the responses to my
post will reveal as much as the post itself, if you gather my drift.
So...who will be the first to suggest the predictions really are all
true, but apply to some other time period or plane, that PT was
talking above our heads, or perhaps he saw all this on the inner, thus
saving us from having to endure the experience on the outer, etc.

The instances in which PT's imaginary world collides or interfaces
with the physical world provide the best opportunities to find out if
his imaginings have any real veracity.

Tianyue












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Post Link Posted: Sun Sep 07 2008 10:48 am
Post subject: Re: Another Look at Paul Twitchell's Eck Vidya Readings
Reply to Tian Yue Reply with quote



On Sep 7, 9:42†am, Tian Yue <tian...@earthlink.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Sep 7, 7:40†am, Etznab <etz...@aol.com> wrote:

On Sep 6, 8:35†pm, Tian Yue <tian...@earthlink.net> wrote:

ECK-Vidya, The Akasa Science of Prophecy, was a small booklet first
published in 1968. The booklet includes 12 predictions made by PT.
Following are summaries of the 12 predictions, which were allegedly
made by PTís reading of the Eck Vidya. I will add a commentary after
each prediction.

1. † † †California isn't going to sink into the ocean any time soon,
contrary to the Cayce predictions, although it would happen later.

How clever. Let's see...PT predicts that another dubious prediction
won't happen. This is so laughable it hurts! Iíd say there were tens
of millions of Californians (like myself) who expressed the same
prediction by the mere fact of continuing to live in California,
ignoring completely Cayceís warning. PT was no different than the
masses of Californians who happily remained in the state. †I can get
in on this sort of prediction, too... I hereby predict that a comet
will not hit the earth next week, though my astrologist neighbor
predicts the contrary. Geologists have long established that the
tectonic plates would continue to move over eons of time, gradually
separating part of California, including Baja California, from the
North American continent. This has been public knowledge for some
time. Itís an easy assumption to make that people like Cayce and PT
would have heard of this, and that they would make predictions about
it. PTís prediction reflects the common scientific consensus of our
times.

2. Russia would turn to capitalism by the middle of the next decade
(1970's).

Russia turned to capitalism in 1992, when the Soviet Union collapsed.
PT was off by 20 years, but he did get this one right. We all have
musings that turn out to be true. There were free market economists
who predicted the Soviet Unionís demise during the cold war. They
thought communism assuredly would, or even certainly must, fail
miserably within a few years, so flawed they believed the system to
be. They thought it would fail on principle, thus affirming capitalism
as superior. Based on PTís conservative leaning politics, it is fairly
reasonable to assume PT may have been in that camp. Many in the West
fervently hoped communism would fail due to inherent flaws. So this
prediction isnít very impressive or shocking, considering the cold war
rhetoric of the times. Lots of political observers were
prognosticating the Soviet Unionís demise. Letís seeÖI hereby predict
that when Castroís brother dies, thus ending the dynasty, Cuba will
gradually return to a more democratic form of government. There is a
good chance Iíll be right.

3. † † †A tidal wave would damage Hawaii in about 1981 so badly that it
would take several years to rebuild.

This prediction is interesting in what it reveals. His predictions
were made in 1968, eight years after a large tsunami hit the Big
Island causing severe destruction, including 61 deaths and $23 million
in property damage. Another large tsunami occurred in 1946 which
flooded the downtown area of Hilo killing 159 people and causing more
than $26 million in damages. There was a small, insignificant tsunami
in 1975, in which two campers on the beach died, but with little
impact, if any, on the island. So this prediction is flat out
nonsense. And the fact is, 50 tsunamis have occurred in Hawaii since
the early 1800ís, so to predict that yet another in a long history of
frequent tsunami events would again occur is not difficult. But a
major tsunami that inflicted severe damage did not occur, so heís way
off here.

What I find revealing is his failure to predict the recent tsunami of
2004 that truly was an event of enormous magnitude. When viewed in
this context, heís not only wrong about Hawaii, but actually missed
predicting the real tsunami event that, had it been predicted, and had
he any credibility on the world stage, could have saved hundreds of
thousands of lives. So he not only screwed up that prediction, he
doubly screwed up by failing to predict the real tsunami. So much for
his ability to read the Eck Vidya.

4.America will regain her united spirit again and see a higher level
of living and wealth from about 1975-2000.

Despite this claim, as I recall there was a recession in the 1970's
during the oil embargo, and during the 1980's we had a recession,
coupled with high inflation and high interest rates, and †Reagan left
us with staggering, record breaking deficits. During Bill Clintonís
eight year term we had very good stock market returns, and low
unemployment, but that all but vanished under George Bush. The economy
has always had its ups and downs, and always will. Itís not hard to be
correct by predicting "in the future America will unite and have a
better economy" or even to say, "in the future America will be divided
and the economy will be slack." Either way one can't lose, especially
if not held rigidly to a specific time frame. PT used a long period of
25 years in his prediction, but the one consistent period of economic
upturn was the eight years under Clinton between 1992 and 2000.
Economists make predictions all the time, and sometimes they are
right, sometimes they are wrong, but in any case, their occasional
success doesn't make them any more psychic than the average person. By
the way, wages in real dollars are at an all time low. People earn
less now than they did in PTís time. The number of homeless people was
on the rise during the time PT predicted, and poverty was widespread,
but ignored by the average American. The same is true today. Some of
the gains made in the stock market during Clintonís time have been
mitigated by the current downturn. PTís prediction here is very
general and highly debatable, but at best falls short of a big
unifying, bullish period that would last for 25 years. I donít give
him any points here. If heíd wanted to make useful economic
predictions, he would have had to have been far more specific to have
made a significant prediction. I think more people would have wanted
to know about our current mortgage crisis. Too bad PT missed that in
his economic forecast. He also said nothing about poverty in America,
homelessness, decreasing wages, lack of health care, and high costs of
education, and crippling student loans. Cloud nine can be fun, but it
isnít reality.

5. The next great war will be fought not between the nations of this
planet, but between one of the other planets and Earth. This will take
place around 2000.

Whoa, Nelly. Way off the chart on this one, and more than just a tad
loony. And to add to the eyebrow raising silliness, according to some
Eckankar apologists, it may have happened on the inner planes! The
ultimate cop-out. So PTís predictions are all true, they happened on
the inner! I wonder how much of the alien stuff came from his
Scientology influence.

6. The food problem will become acute by around 1980 and the world
will turn to the US to feed them. The US will develop a synthetic food
which will give relief.

A big stretch here, in my view. The U.S. has not come up with a
synthetic food on any mass scale, and it certainly hasnít found a
synthetic food to feed the world. He is wrong in this prediction. By
the way, genetically altered food is not synthetic, and some believe
this development will be looked upon someday as one of the worst
environmental disasters in history as the full consequences take
effect. Europeans are correct in rejecting this technology. Sounds as
though PT had been reading too many science fiction novels. Soylent
Green, anyone?
When PT wrote this (1968) there was a very popular book on the market
that predicted mass world starvation due to the sharply increasing
population. As Wikipedia states, ďThe Population Bomb (1968) is a book
written by Paul R. Ehrlich. A best-selling work, it predicted disaster
for humanity due to overpopulation and the "population explosion". The
book predicted that "in the 1970s and 1980s hundreds of millions of
people will starve to death", that nothing can be done to avoid mass
famine greater than any in the history, and radical action is needed
to limit the overpopulation. History proved Ehrlich wrong, as the mass
starvations predicted for the 1970s and 1980s never occurred.Ē

The bookís warning was very alarming and widely discussed in the
media. But now, world starvation truly is occurring, caused in part by
converting corn crops to ethanol production, thus reducing the food
supply and raising the cost of food, and also by the oil prices, which
affect distribution and even the cost of petroleum based fertilizers.
But still no synthetic food has been produced by the US to save the
world, and in fact, the US may be exacerbating the problem rather than
helping.

It isnít at all a stretch to surmise that a known plagiarist would
read that book (which came out in the same year PT made this
ďpredictionĒ) and convert the bookís thesis into an Eck vidya
prediction. †This isnít plagiary, but PT did opportunistically glean
material from near and far to use in his own writings. Iím shaking my
head with dismay. In any case, he was wrong, as was the author of the
book.

7. The shifting of the polar caps will cause an upset in the world
around 2200.

Quite clever here. Anyone can make a prediction that is so far in the
future that no one will live long enough to see.

Let's see... letís have some fun. Hereís a prediction: Around the year
2300, long after we are all gone and no longer concerned with such
issues, Ronald Reagan will be cloned and return to power with his
memory intact. His first act will be to lead the world against the
aliens who took over in 2200. Klemp, who overcomes his present
illnesses will live to be at least 400 years old, and will accuse
Reagan of encroaching on alien personal property when Reagan steals a
space ship from them and leaves the planet for good, as his planetary
bid for world dominance over aliens fails. Klemp had hoped to make a
deal with the aliens in order to leave the planet himself, to make a
new life in the uninhabitable gases of Venus. Rebazar, still living of
course, will relieve Klemp of his duties, stripping him of his
initiations, after Klemp once again stripped down to his birthday suit
in an airport and was arrested for frightening little girls passing
by. I HAVE SPOKEN, heh, heh. Prove me wrong! (See what just a little
imagination can come up with?)

8. A new type of virus will sweep the world in 1975, which will be so
new to scientists that it will take time to develop a remedy.

In one PT publication I recall his predicted virus being a "moon
plague." This has not been proven to have occurred. The fact is there
are many rare viruses that experts have long predicted will eventually
mutate into a form that becomes dangerous to humans, and such viruses
have long been the subject of serious discussion by many besides PT.
The Center for Disease Control has been deeply concerned about this
for ages. One that is really scary is the Ebola virus. Another is the
common flu virus (such as the Spanish Flu that killed millions), like
the bird flu or possibly SARS. Most expert immunologists figure human
kind is due for a life-threatening virus or bacterium to become
epidemic anytime now, especially since weakened immune systems from
overuse of antibiotics and poor nutrition are commonplace. We canít
ignore the emergence of HIV, which is a serious problem worldwide,
along with the resurgence of antibiotic resistant tuberculosis and
news strains of malaria. MRSA looms as well. This is not a difficult
prediction to make. Anyway, considering that plagues have always
struck every so often in our history, I hereby predict with complete
confidence that a terrible virus will sweep the world, and scientists
will not have a remedy. The only thing I canít do is predict exactly
when that will happen. PT, not surprisingly, could do no better.

But a remedy? There are no outright ďcuresĒ for viruses in the world
of biochemical medicine. There are vaccines used to prevent viral
infections, and antiviral drugs to relieve symptoms and pain, but no
outright true "remedies" or cures. Itís still up to the patientís
immune system to do the bulk of the work when a virus is involved. In
any case, HIV, malaria and tuberculosis are still killing millions.

PT wasnít the only one thinking about alien viruses during this
period. Itís interesting that a novel about an alien virus appeared
around the time PTís booklet was published, which reflects the
interests of American culture of the time. The Andromeda Strain
(1969), by Michael Crichton, is a science fiction novel depicting the
efforts of a team of scientists investigating a deadly alien
microorganism which clots human blood. In the novel, scientists
scramble to find a vaccine. Maybe Crichton was reading the Eck Vidya?
Either that or they both were reflecting the imaginings of the times,
just like thousands of others around the world. And letís not forget
PT was somewhat of a science fiction writer.

Hereís a thought: While PT was in the higher worlds reading the Eck
Vidya (with poor reading skills at best) why didnít he try to read
what the actual ďremedyĒ would be, and how it would be developed, to
give us a heads up? If a person has such abilities, what is the
purpose of making predictions? To help humankind, or to show off oneís
ability? There are so many things about our history that PT failed to
see, such as the threat of Osama Bin Laden and the 9/11 catastrophe,
or the Katrina disaster, or the threat of global warming, or the
current mortgage crisis. He missed those, and instead reported
tsunamis in Hawaii that didnít pan out. And notice how broad and
general the predictions are? This tactic is a very safe method to get
things right once in awhile, since it covers almost any possibility.
If more details were provided, it makes it more difficult to shrug off
if the prediction fails. For example, if PT had given some details of
the plague, such as what the symptoms would be, who would be
vulnerable, where it would first break out, then that exposes him even
more if the prediction doesnít pan out. If it were HIV, he could have
said intervenous drug users and gays would be especially vulnerable,
but he cryptically offered no details at all. Which begs the question,
just how much can an Eck vidya reader see in the way of details?
According to some of his readings (the kind that canít ever be
verified), he can see enormous detail, even producing names, dates,
places, and even concepts and words. But with some of his readings,
they lack details and turn out to be bunk.

9. Children will start to be taught by TV via home study around the
end of the century.

Online courses exist. But thatís on the internet, which is a truly
monumental technological development of huge historical proportions
that PT failed to predict. And as I recall, there were some televised
courses on public television (UHF) as far back as the sixties. But
PTís prediction wasnít the advent of televised courses (not a hard
thing for anyone to guess), but of the advent of kids staying home to
study from TV. I seriously doubt that children will stay home and
learn exclusively from their TVís, even with televised classes,
anytime soon. Many if not most parents lack the skills to teach their
own kids. There is presently no indication that professionally trained
teachers, directly teaching kids, are going to be replaced with home
schooling using tv.

10. By the late 1980's the minerals and precious metals will have
disappeared from their usual places, forcing exploitation of the
Amazon basin, the South Pole and some part of the African jungles.

Depletion of resources has long been predicted by geologists and
environmentalists. All one
had to do was read a newspaper or science journals, and Iíve no doubt
that is exactly what PT did. And searching for new sources of raw
materials in unpopulated, remote, and inaccessible regions has long
been a subject of discussion. In fact, the search for gold and other
resources in remote lands is what the voyages of such navigators as
Columbus was all about. This is a prediction that is too easy. No
points here. Speaking of the polar caps, he failed to make what would
have been a stupendous prediction, which is the melting of the polar
ice caps due to global warming. Now_that_ would have been useful.

11. By the end of the century voting will be done by instant
electronic machines by voters in their homes, instead of at the polls..

Weíre now in 2008, and weíre far from voting in our homes. In fact,
voting fraud and errors are a big concern, and oversight of the voting
process is increasing, making it highly unlikely weíll be voting in
our homes anytime soon, since the potential for voter fraud would
increase. †And again, PT failed to predict the advent of the internet,
which could have made home voting technologically possible. He keeps
missing the real veins of gold in his ďreadings.Ē The internet is
changing our culture, and yet PT rattles on about events that havenít
happened, rather than hit the bullís eye of the amazing events that
have.

12. By the end of the century, orthodox religions will have begun to
lose ground, along with other semi-religious and occult arts such as
astrology, yoga, and many of the present day cults, although ECKANKAR
will begin to grow.

From all that I can see, yoga and other similar practices are once
again on the rise. Just about everyone I know goes to yoga classes
these days. Taijichuan and qigong are hugely popular. Cults like
Scientology and TM are still around and in the news (anybody find it
ironic that PT refers to ďcultsĒ in his prediction?). And from all
that I can see, people are still involved with Christianity, as
evidenced by the power of the Christian right over our politics.
Conservative Christian theology and ideology has become a large
political and cultural force in our society, as demonstrated by the
recent vice presidential pick of Palin, who was chosen in part to
assuage the evangelical right wing. The abortion issue, as well as
creationism, and other anti-science propaganda, such as the refusal to
admit the existence of global warming among some Christians, have run
rampant in political debate. Politicians still get elected only if
they regularly attend church and are sufficiently pious. Bush has said
his (Christian) God talks to him about foreign policy, and the public
generally seems to accept that. And Eckankar has not grown by all that
I have seen. In fact, it seems to be in decline. No, PT gets no cigar
on this one.

Overall, I'll generously give PT one clearly correct prediction (the
turn to capitalism by the Soviet Union, although, as I noted, many
political and economic pundits were hoping, praying and predicting
that would occur), 8 clearly incorrect, or ridiculous and
unsupportable, and 3 that would have been predicted by anybody reading
the daily news or using common sense, or were already supported by
predictions from science. PT commented on issues that were in some
ways, I think, rather broad and predictable, such as California NOT
falling into the ocean. So his success rate, to be very generous, is
at best 10 %, or at the very best 20%, or to put this another way, he
was 85% to 95% wrong, hardly proving him to be psychic. Would anyone
with any sanity put their faith in a person who is wrong 85% to 95 %
of the time?

What is far more telling, I think, is his apparent inability to
predict his own death, to ďpredictĒ his own successor Darwin Gross or
Harold Klemp, his failure to predict the internet (which hugely has
affected his teachings, due to spread of information revealing the
Eckankar controversy), his failure to predict David Lane, charges of
plagiarism, and other lamentable difficulties that have troubled his
legacy since his death. † Paul Twitchell could not read the Eck Vidya.

Tianyue

PS: If all this isnít enough to ponder, then hereís a repost of
something Joe wrote awhile back:

Talk To God:

Prophecy, Sex, and Liberation
[from TMOSM by D. Lane]

DEAR GURU: Things are so bad for this country that I must ask you to
talk to God about the political future. I am asking as a loyal reader
of Candid Press.
--Jan Baldheim

DEAR JAN: I didn't want to make any predictions on certain events, but
you caught me on a technical point. I did promise to answer the
questions of all Candid Press readers. I predict a bad year for my
competitor, Jean Dixon, as she will have illness and financial loss.
The war in Vietnam will increase until late in 1968 when the doves of
both sides come to the negotiating table. In 1968, Johnson and
Humphrey will run against Romney and Percy--and win again!.
I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

[In his featured column "Talk to God" for CANDID PRESS (December 10,
1967)]

† † †Perhaps the most controversial document to surface about Paul
Twitchell's hidden life is his featured column, "Talk to God," for
Candid Press in 1967. In the column, Twitchell claims to speak
directly with God about reader's personal and spiritual problems. The
founder of Eckankar always ends his words of advice (which he states
comes from God Himself) with the bold statement: I HAVE SPOKEN!

† † †The article raises some serious questions about Twitchell's
personal motives for founding Eckankar. For not only does Twitchell
make erroneous prophecies (as in the preceding quotation, Johnson
never did run for office in 1968 as Twitchell predicted, nor did his
proposed running mate, Humphrey, win the race. Nixon, not Romney as
Twitchell wrongly prophesied, finally won the Presidential Election),
but he also indulges in satirical sexual admonitions. A few graphic
examples will best illustrate the latter:

DEAR MR. TWITCHELL: My penis is too long. Can you ask God to shorten
it for me?
--BIG PETER

DEAR PETER: Why? That's what God said when He heard you wanted a
smaller sex organ. God says that we can all be happy with what He
gives unto us and you shall be happy to.
I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR GURU: I have the strange desire to wear lace panties. As I am a
normal man in every other way, I want to know if God thinks this is
bad?

--FRILLY FRED
DEAR FRILLY: He doesn't think it is good. We talked over your fetish -
for that is what you have. We both feel that your fetish is due to
lack of female companionship. You wish to secure a relationship with a
woman whose initials are P.I. Do not ask how I know nor shall you
question this advice which I now sayeth unto you: Call her and ask her
for a date. She will accept. Do not wear your panties on the date. . ..
and you shall never again have a desire to wear panties. I HAVE
SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR LEARNED ONE: My penis is too small for a man of my age. Can you
talk to God and make my penis grow?
--TINY MAN

DEAR TINY: God and I talked about your penis--and God has good news
for you. He says that your penis is of average size and that you only
believe it is too small for you failed to satisfy one woman when you
were 19. Because it is of the proper size, there is no need for God
to
make it grow. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

† † †In the midst of Twitchell's incorrect prophecies and sexual
innuendoes, he also talks about Rebazar Tarzs and Eckankar to his
Candid Press readers. One can't help wondering, however, how serious
Twitchell is in presenting his bilocation philosophy with such a
humorous and mordacious context. Below are a few excerpts from the
column on Eckankar:

DEAR ECK TEACHER: After learning bilocation, I sent my sole-being
[sic] to Vietnam to visit my son who is stationed there-and he didn't
recognize me. Why?
--MRS. HELEN AYNEZ

DEAR MRS.: I was with you that day and I wanted so to allow your son
to see you--but I was hopeless to help you. You see, Eckankar is only
able to function as a path to God--and as such, it is no good if
learned for ulterior motives. You bought my book "Introduction to
Eckankar" just so you could visit your son. As entering God's universe
wasn't your goal, so the true power of Eckankar failed to work fully
for you. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR PAUL: I am only 16 and my problem may not be the type that you
normally talk to God about, but here goes. I am still a virgin! My
three best friends aren't and they always tease me. I want to wait
until I marry, but they keep kidding me. What should I do?
--M. OF MICHIGAN

DEAR M. OF MICHIGAN: If a problem worries a person, then it is
important enough for me to talk to God about. First and most important
is what Rebazar Tarzs once told me. He said: "Unto thine own self and
not beyond." My teacher meant that you must do only what you feel is
best for yourself and these are God's sentiments exactly. By the way,
God wants you to know that your three friends are still virgins. They
are merely trying to sound sophisticated and adult. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

† † †"Talk to God," probably more than any other piece of evidence,
raises the question about the genuineness of Eckankar and about the
authenticity of its founder. It is an issue which we will explore at
length in the next chapter.

Tianyue,

† †Seriously, I find the second part very telling. Faced with
ridiculous questions Paul was prepared to answer in kind.

† †I find this telling on account of what some people expect
from a "Godman". I find it telling that Paul Twitchell did not
have all the answers - as many people might imagine that
"God" naturally would.

† †Really I'm being serious here. No kidding.

*********

† †I think it shows something especially telling when a story
is told that Paul Twitchell took poison when he knew it would
harm him ... like Buddha when he ate the tainted rice!

† †Why was the story told like that? Because with Paul Twit-
chell's state of consciousness there is no way he could be
poisoned? I listened to the audiotape from 1970 when Paul
talked about this incident. If I'm not mistaken he said that it
knocked him out for about three days! And he didn't sound
to me like someone who knew beforehand that someone
put poison in his juice. I think it's fair to say he might have
had a "feeling" perhaps, that something might not be right.
I doubt though that he knew beforehand how it would later
impact his life. Turning him white and rendering him unable
to walk up his own steps for a time.

Etznab



Tianyue wrote:


Quote:
What I find revealing in his personal readings for indiviudals is

the detail he provides, that he didn't provide in the other readings.
He can tell us the initials of a person to be contacted, who will
telephone whom and at what time, but can't tell us accurately
anything regarding his predictions.<

To add to this, what this means is that when PT is doing an individual
reading that he later publishes, we have no way of verifying if it is
a real reading or not, since, for example, the questions he was
answering in the Talk to God series could be completely fictitious
(which I think is highly likely, considering the gratuitous, salacious
context which has the tone of a gossipy, pseudo-psychic writing for a
tabloid), or at best are not open for follow up questions from the
recipient, so we have no way of knowing if the reading was useful or
accurate, or if any of the statements turned out to be true. It could
all be made up. In contrast, the readings of the future time track for
all humankind are open to discussion and observations as to whether
the predictions have come to pass, since the predictions involve
events that can be verified. And in these verifiable predictions, he
has a very poor batting average.

Bottom line: Whenever PT's comments pertain to verifiable reality, his
statements often end up incorrect or even ridiculous. In these
statements, he provides little if any detail, sticking to bare bones
generalities, since details can be verified and proven wrong. On the
other hand, when his statements pertain to persons or events that are
not possible to objectively verify (personal readings, Rebazar, etc.),
he provides an abundance of detail, since the details are not subject
to verification, and he can thus say whatever he likes without fear of
being found out to be wrong.

I figured this was obvious, but it occurred to me I should probably
spell this out in greater detail. This is why I included the Talk to
God readings, since they provide an insightful contrast to the
predictions.

Tianyue








Quote:

So, I expect the rationalizations will start coming in. It will be
interesting to see what sort of responses people give to PT's failed
predictions. A note to the observant readership: the responses to my
post will reveal as much as the post itself, if you gather my drift.
So...who will be the first to suggest the predictions really are all
true, but apply to some other time period or plane, †that PT was
talking above our heads, or perhaps he saw all this on the inner, thus
saving us from having to endure the experience on the outer, etc.

The instances in which PT's imaginary world collides or interfaces
with the physical world provide the best opportunities to find out if
his imaginings have any real veracity.

Tianyue












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Post Link Posted: Sun Sep 07 2008 2:46 pm
Post subject: Re: Another Look at Paul Twitchell's Eck Vidya Readings
Reply to Etznab Reply with quote



On Sep 7, 9:42†am, Tian Yue <tian...@earthlink.net> wrote:

Quote:
On Sep 7, 7:40†am, Etznab <etz...@aol.com> wrote:

On Sep 6, 8:35†pm, Tian Yue <tian...@earthlink.net> wrote:

ECK-Vidya, The Akasa Science of Prophecy, was a small booklet first
published in 1968. The booklet includes 12 predictions made by PT.
Following are summaries of the 12 predictions, which were allegedly
made by PTís reading of the Eck Vidya. I will add a commentary after
each prediction.

1. † † †California isn't going to sink into the ocean any time soon,
contrary to the Cayce predictions, although it would happen later.

How clever. Let's see...PT predicts that another dubious prediction
won't happen. This is so laughable it hurts! Iíd say there were tens
of millions of Californians (like myself) who expressed the same
prediction by the mere fact of continuing to live in California,
ignoring completely Cayceís warning. PT was no different than the
masses of Californians who happily remained in the state. †I can get
in on this sort of prediction, too... I hereby predict that a comet
will not hit the earth next week, though my astrologist neighbor
predicts the contrary. Geologists have long established that the
tectonic plates would continue to move over eons of time, gradually
separating part of California, including Baja California, from the
North American continent. This has been public knowledge for some
time. Itís an easy assumption to make that people like Cayce and PT
would have heard of this, and that they would make predictions about
it. PTís prediction reflects the common scientific consensus of our
times.

2. Russia would turn to capitalism by the middle of the next decade
(1970's).

Russia turned to capitalism in 1992, when the Soviet Union collapsed.
PT was off by 20 years, but he did get this one right. We all have
musings that turn out to be true. There were free market economists
who predicted the Soviet Unionís demise during the cold war. They
thought communism assuredly would, or even certainly must, fail
miserably within a few years, so flawed they believed the system to
be. They thought it would fail on principle, thus affirming capitalism
as superior. Based on PTís conservative leaning politics, it is fairly
reasonable to assume PT may have been in that camp. Many in the West
fervently hoped communism would fail due to inherent flaws. So this
prediction isnít very impressive or shocking, considering the cold war
rhetoric of the times. Lots of political observers were
prognosticating the Soviet Unionís demise. Letís seeÖI hereby predict
that when Castroís brother dies, thus ending the dynasty, Cuba will
gradually return to a more democratic form of government. There is a
good chance Iíll be right.

3. † † †A tidal wave would damage Hawaii in about 1981 so badly that it
would take several years to rebuild.

This prediction is interesting in what it reveals. His predictions
were made in 1968, eight years after a large tsunami hit the Big
Island causing severe destruction, including 61 deaths and $23 million
in property damage. Another large tsunami occurred in 1946 which
flooded the downtown area of Hilo killing 159 people and causing more
than $26 million in damages. There was a small, insignificant tsunami
in 1975, in which two campers on the beach died, but with little
impact, if any, on the island. So this prediction is flat out
nonsense. And the fact is, 50 tsunamis have occurred in Hawaii since
the early 1800ís, so to predict that yet another in a long history of
frequent tsunami events would again occur is not difficult. But a
major tsunami that inflicted severe damage did not occur, so heís way
off here.

What I find revealing is his failure to predict the recent tsunami of
2004 that truly was an event of enormous magnitude. When viewed in
this context, heís not only wrong about Hawaii, but actually missed
predicting the real tsunami event that, had it been predicted, and had
he any credibility on the world stage, could have saved hundreds of
thousands of lives. So he not only screwed up that prediction, he
doubly screwed up by failing to predict the real tsunami. So much for
his ability to read the Eck Vidya.

4.America will regain her united spirit again and see a higher level
of living and wealth from about 1975-2000.

Despite this claim, as I recall there was a recession in the 1970's
during the oil embargo, and during the 1980's we had a recession,
coupled with high inflation and high interest rates, and †Reagan left
us with staggering, record breaking deficits. During Bill Clintonís
eight year term we had very good stock market returns, and low
unemployment, but that all but vanished under George Bush. The economy
has always had its ups and downs, and always will. Itís not hard to be
correct by predicting "in the future America will unite and have a
better economy" or even to say, "in the future America will be divided
and the economy will be slack." Either way one can't lose, especially
if not held rigidly to a specific time frame. PT used a long period of
25 years in his prediction, but the one consistent period of economic
upturn was the eight years under Clinton between 1992 and 2000.
Economists make predictions all the time, and sometimes they are
right, sometimes they are wrong, but in any case, their occasional
success doesn't make them any more psychic than the average person. By
the way, wages in real dollars are at an all time low. People earn
less now than they did in PTís time. The number of homeless people was
on the rise during the time PT predicted, and poverty was widespread,
but ignored by the average American. The same is true today. Some of
the gains made in the stock market during Clintonís time have been
mitigated by the current downturn. PTís prediction here is very
general and highly debatable, but at best falls short of a big
unifying, bullish period that would last for 25 years. I donít give
him any points here. If heíd wanted to make useful economic
predictions, he would have had to have been far more specific to have
made a significant prediction. I think more people would have wanted
to know about our current mortgage crisis. Too bad PT missed that in
his economic forecast. He also said nothing about poverty in America,
homelessness, decreasing wages, lack of health care, and high costs of
education, and crippling student loans. Cloud nine can be fun, but it
isnít reality.

5. The next great war will be fought not between the nations of this
planet, but between one of the other planets and Earth. This will take
place around 2000.

Whoa, Nelly. Way off the chart on this one, and more than just a tad
loony. And to add to the eyebrow raising silliness, according to some
Eckankar apologists, it may have happened on the inner planes! The
ultimate cop-out. So PTís predictions are all true, they happened on
the inner! I wonder how much of the alien stuff came from his
Scientology influence.

6. The food problem will become acute by around 1980 and the world
will turn to the US to feed them. The US will develop a synthetic food
which will give relief.

A big stretch here, in my view. The U.S. has not come up with a
synthetic food on any mass scale, and it certainly hasnít found a
synthetic food to feed the world. He is wrong in this prediction. By
the way, genetically altered food is not synthetic, and some believe
this development will be looked upon someday as one of the worst
environmental disasters in history as the full consequences take
effect. Europeans are correct in rejecting this technology. Sounds as
though PT had been reading too many science fiction novels. Soylent
Green, anyone?
When PT wrote this (1968) there was a very popular book on the market
that predicted mass world starvation due to the sharply increasing
population. As Wikipedia states, ďThe Population Bomb (1968) is a book
written by Paul R. Ehrlich. A best-selling work, it predicted disaster
for humanity due to overpopulation and the "population explosion". The
book predicted that "in the 1970s and 1980s hundreds of millions of
people will starve to death", that nothing can be done to avoid mass
famine greater than any in the history, and radical action is needed
to limit the overpopulation. History proved Ehrlich wrong, as the mass
starvations predicted for the 1970s and 1980s never occurred.Ē

The bookís warning was very alarming and widely discussed in the
media. But now, world starvation truly is occurring, caused in part by
converting corn crops to ethanol production, thus reducing the food
supply and raising the cost of food, and also by the oil prices, which
affect distribution and even the cost of petroleum based fertilizers.
But still no synthetic food has been produced by the US to save the
world, and in fact, the US may be exacerbating the problem rather than
helping.

It isnít at all a stretch to surmise that a known plagiarist would
read that book (which came out in the same year PT made this
ďpredictionĒ) and convert the bookís thesis into an Eck vidya
prediction. †This isnít plagiary, but PT did opportunistically glean
material from near and far to use in his own writings. Iím shaking my
head with dismay. In any case, he was wrong, as was the author of the
book.

7. The shifting of the polar caps will cause an upset in the world
around 2200.

Quite clever here. Anyone can make a prediction that is so far in the
future that no one will live long enough to see.

Let's see... letís have some fun. Hereís a prediction: Around the year
2300, long after we are all gone and no longer concerned with such
issues, Ronald Reagan will be cloned and return to power with his
memory intact. His first act will be to lead the world against the
aliens who took over in 2200. Klemp, who overcomes his present
illnesses will live to be at least 400 years old, and will accuse
Reagan of encroaching on alien personal property when Reagan steals a
space ship from them and leaves the planet for good, as his planetary
bid for world dominance over aliens fails. Klemp had hoped to make a
deal with the aliens in order to leave the planet himself, to make a
new life in the uninhabitable gases of Venus. Rebazar, still living of
course, will relieve Klemp of his duties, stripping him of his
initiations, after Klemp once again stripped down to his birthday suit
in an airport and was arrested for frightening little girls passing
by. I HAVE SPOKEN, heh, heh. Prove me wrong! (See what just a little
imagination can come up with?)

8. A new type of virus will sweep the world in 1975, which will be so
new to scientists that it will take time to develop a remedy.

In one PT publication I recall his predicted virus being a "moon
plague." This has not been proven to have occurred. The fact is there
are many rare viruses that experts have long predicted will eventually
mutate into a form that becomes dangerous to humans, and such viruses
have long been the subject of serious discussion by many besides PT.
The Center for Disease Control has been deeply concerned about this
for ages. One that is really scary is the Ebola virus. Another is the
common flu virus (such as the Spanish Flu that killed millions), like
the bird flu or possibly SARS. Most expert immunologists figure human
kind is due for a life-threatening virus or bacterium to become
epidemic anytime now, especially since weakened immune systems from
overuse of antibiotics and poor nutrition are commonplace. We canít
ignore the emergence of HIV, which is a serious problem worldwide,
along with the resurgence of antibiotic resistant tuberculosis and
news strains of malaria. MRSA looms as well. This is not a difficult
prediction to make. Anyway, considering that plagues have always
struck every so often in our history, I hereby predict with complete
confidence that a terrible virus will sweep the world, and scientists
will not have a remedy. The only thing I canít do is predict exactly
when that will happen. PT, not surprisingly, could do no better.

But a remedy? There are no outright ďcuresĒ for viruses in the world
of biochemical medicine. There are vaccines used to prevent viral
infections, and antiviral drugs to relieve symptoms and pain, but no
outright true "remedies" or cures. Itís still up to the patientís
immune system to do the bulk of the work when a virus is involved. In
any case, HIV, malaria and tuberculosis are still killing millions.

PT wasnít the only one thinking about alien viruses during this
period. Itís interesting that a novel about an alien virus appeared
around the time PTís booklet was published, which reflects the
interests of American culture of the time. The Andromeda Strain
(1969), by Michael Crichton, is a science fiction novel depicting the
efforts of a team of scientists investigating a deadly alien
microorganism which clots human blood. In the novel, scientists
scramble to find a vaccine. Maybe Crichton was reading the Eck Vidya?
Either that or they both were reflecting the imaginings of the times,
just like thousands of others around the world. And letís not forget
PT was somewhat of a science fiction writer.

Hereís a thought: While PT was in the higher worlds reading the Eck
Vidya (with poor reading skills at best) why didnít he try to read
what the actual ďremedyĒ would be, and how it would be developed, to
give us a heads up? If a person has such abilities, what is the
purpose of making predictions? To help humankind, or to show off oneís
ability? There are so many things about our history that PT failed to
see, such as the threat of Osama Bin Laden and the 9/11 catastrophe,
or the Katrina disaster, or the threat of global warming, or the
current mortgage crisis. He missed those, and instead reported
tsunamis in Hawaii that didnít pan out. And notice how broad and
general the predictions are? This tactic is a very safe method to get
things right once in awhile, since it covers almost any possibility.
If more details were provided, it makes it more difficult to shrug off
if the prediction fails. For example, if PT had given some details of
the plague, such as what the symptoms would be, who would be
vulnerable, where it would first break out, then that exposes him even
more if the prediction doesnít pan out. If it were HIV, he could have
said intervenous drug users and gays would be especially vulnerable,
but he cryptically offered no details at all. Which begs the question,
just how much can an Eck vidya reader see in the way of details?
According to some of his readings (the kind that canít ever be
verified), he can see enormous detail, even producing names, dates,
places, and even concepts and words. But with some of his readings,
they lack details and turn out to be bunk.

9. Children will start to be taught by TV via home study around the
end of the century.

Online courses exist. But thatís on the internet, which is a truly
monumental technological development of huge historical proportions
that PT failed to predict. And as I recall, there were some televised
courses on public television (UHF) as far back as the sixties. But
PTís prediction wasnít the advent of televised courses (not a hard
thing for anyone to guess), but of the advent of kids staying home to
study from TV. I seriously doubt that children will stay home and
learn exclusively from their TVís, even with televised classes,
anytime soon. Many if not most parents lack the skills to teach their
own kids. There is presently no indication that professionally trained
teachers, directly teaching kids, are going to be replaced with home
schooling using tv.

10. By the late 1980's the minerals and precious metals will have
disappeared from their usual places, forcing exploitation of the
Amazon basin, the South Pole and some part of the African jungles.

Depletion of resources has long been predicted by geologists and
environmentalists. All one
had to do was read a newspaper or science journals, and Iíve no doubt
that is exactly what PT did. And searching for new sources of raw
materials in unpopulated, remote, and inaccessible regions has long
been a subject of discussion. In fact, the search for gold and other
resources in remote lands is what the voyages of such navigators as
Columbus was all about. This is a prediction that is too easy. No
points here. Speaking of the polar caps, he failed to make what would
have been a stupendous prediction, which is the melting of the polar
ice caps due to global warming. Now_that_ would have been useful.

11. By the end of the century voting will be done by instant
electronic machines by voters in their homes, instead of at the polls..

Weíre now in 2008, and weíre far from voting in our homes. In fact,
voting fraud and errors are a big concern, and oversight of the voting
process is increasing, making it highly unlikely weíll be voting in
our homes anytime soon, since the potential for voter fraud would
increase. †And again, PT failed to predict the advent of the internet,
which could have made home voting technologically possible. He keeps
missing the real veins of gold in his ďreadings.Ē The internet is
changing our culture, and yet PT rattles on about events that havenít
happened, rather than hit the bullís eye of the amazing events that
have.

12. By the end of the century, orthodox religions will have begun to
lose ground, along with other semi-religious and occult arts such as
astrology, yoga, and many of the present day cults, although ECKANKAR
will begin to grow.

From all that I can see, yoga and other similar practices are once
again on the rise. Just about everyone I know goes to yoga classes
these days. Taijichuan and qigong are hugely popular. Cults like
Scientology and TM are still around and in the news (anybody find it
ironic that PT refers to ďcultsĒ in his prediction?). And from all
that I can see, people are still involved with Christianity, as
evidenced by the power of the Christian right over our politics.
Conservative Christian theology and ideology has become a large
political and cultural force in our society, as demonstrated by the
recent vice presidential pick of Palin, who was chosen in part to
assuage the evangelical right wing. The abortion issue, as well as
creationism, and other anti-science propaganda, such as the refusal to
admit the existence of global warming among some Christians, have run
rampant in political debate. Politicians still get elected only if
they regularly attend church and are sufficiently pious. Bush has said
his (Christian) God talks to him about foreign policy, and the public
generally seems to accept that. And Eckankar has not grown by all that
I have seen. In fact, it seems to be in decline. No, PT gets no cigar
on this one.

Overall, I'll generously give PT one clearly correct prediction (the
turn to capitalism by the Soviet Union, although, as I noted, many
political and economic pundits were hoping, praying and predicting
that would occur), 8 clearly incorrect, or ridiculous and
unsupportable, and 3 that would have been predicted by anybody reading
the daily news or using common sense, or were already supported by
predictions from science. PT commented on issues that were in some
ways, I think, rather broad and predictable, such as California NOT
falling into the ocean. So his success rate, to be very generous, is
at best 10 %, or at the very best 20%, or to put this another way, he
was 85% to 95% wrong, hardly proving him to be psychic. Would anyone
with any sanity put their faith in a person who is wrong 85% to 95 %
of the time?

What is far more telling, I think, is his apparent inability to
predict his own death, to ďpredictĒ his own successor Darwin Gross or
Harold Klemp, his failure to predict the internet (which hugely has
affected his teachings, due to spread of information revealing the
Eckankar controversy), his failure to predict David Lane, charges of
plagiarism, and other lamentable difficulties that have troubled his
legacy since his death. † Paul Twitchell could not read the Eck Vidya.

Tianyue

PS: If all this isnít enough to ponder, then hereís a repost of
something Joe wrote awhile back:

Talk To God:

Prophecy, Sex, and Liberation
[from TMOSM by D. Lane]

DEAR GURU: Things are so bad for this country that I must ask you to
talk to God about the political future. I am asking as a loyal reader
of Candid Press.
--Jan Baldheim

DEAR JAN: I didn't want to make any predictions on certain events, but
you caught me on a technical point. I did promise to answer the
questions of all Candid Press readers. I predict a bad year for my
competitor, Jean Dixon, as she will have illness and financial loss.
The war in Vietnam will increase until late in 1968 when the doves of
both sides come to the negotiating table. In 1968, Johnson and
Humphrey will run against Romney and Percy--and win again!.
I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

[In his featured column "Talk to God" for CANDID PRESS (December 10,
1967)]

† † †Perhaps the most controversial document to surface about Paul
Twitchell's hidden life is his featured column, "Talk to God," for
Candid Press in 1967. In the column, Twitchell claims to speak
directly with God about reader's personal and spiritual problems. The
founder of Eckankar always ends his words of advice (which he states
comes from God Himself) with the bold statement: I HAVE SPOKEN!

† † †The article raises some serious questions about Twitchell's
personal motives for founding Eckankar. For not only does Twitchell
make erroneous prophecies (as in the preceding quotation, Johnson
never did run for office in 1968 as Twitchell predicted, nor did his
proposed running mate, Humphrey, win the race. Nixon, not Romney as
Twitchell wrongly prophesied, finally won the Presidential Election),
but he also indulges in satirical sexual admonitions. A few graphic
examples will best illustrate the latter:

DEAR MR. TWITCHELL: My penis is too long. Can you ask God to shorten
it for me?
--BIG PETER

DEAR PETER: Why? That's what God said when He heard you wanted a
smaller sex organ. God says that we can all be happy with what He
gives unto us and you shall be happy to.
I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR GURU: I have the strange desire to wear lace panties. As I am a
normal man in every other way, I want to know if God thinks this is
bad?

--FRILLY FRED
DEAR FRILLY: He doesn't think it is good. We talked over your fetish -
for that is what you have. We both feel that your fetish is due to
lack of female companionship. You wish to secure a relationship with a
woman whose initials are P.I. Do not ask how I know nor shall you
question this advice which I now sayeth unto you: Call her and ask her
for a date. She will accept. Do not wear your panties on the date. . ..
and you shall never again have a desire to wear panties. I HAVE
SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR LEARNED ONE: My penis is too small for a man of my age. Can you
talk to God and make my penis grow?
--TINY MAN

DEAR TINY: God and I talked about your penis--and God has good news
for you. He says that your penis is of average size and that you only
believe it is too small for you failed to satisfy one woman when you
were 19. Because it is of the proper size, there is no need for God
to
make it grow. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

† † †In the midst of Twitchell's incorrect prophecies and sexual
innuendoes, he also talks about Rebazar Tarzs and Eckankar to his
Candid Press readers. One can't help wondering, however, how serious
Twitchell is in presenting his bilocation philosophy with such a
humorous and mordacious context. Below are a few excerpts from the
column on Eckankar:

DEAR ECK TEACHER: After learning bilocation, I sent my sole-being
[sic] to Vietnam to visit my son who is stationed there-and he didn't
recognize me. Why?
--MRS. HELEN AYNEZ

DEAR MRS.: I was with you that day and I wanted so to allow your son
to see you--but I was hopeless to help you. You see, Eckankar is only
able to function as a path to God--and as such, it is no good if
learned for ulterior motives. You bought my book "Introduction to
Eckankar" just so you could visit your son. As entering God's universe
wasn't your goal, so the true power of Eckankar failed to work fully
for you. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

DEAR PAUL: I am only 16 and my problem may not be the type that you
normally talk to God about, but here goes. I am still a virgin! My
three best friends aren't and they always tease me. I want to wait
until I marry, but they keep kidding me. What should I do?
--M. OF MICHIGAN

DEAR M. OF MICHIGAN: If a problem worries a person, then it is
important enough for me to talk to God about. First and most important
is what Rebazar Tarzs once told me. He said: "Unto thine own self and
not beyond." My teacher meant that you must do only what you feel is
best for yourself and these are God's sentiments exactly. By the way,
God wants you to know that your three friends are still virgins. They
are merely trying to sound sophisticated and adult. I HAVE SPOKEN!
--Paul Twitchell

† † †"Talk to God," probably more than any other piece of evidence,
raises the question about the genuineness of Eckankar and about the
authenticity of its founder. It is an issue which we will explore at
length in the next chapter.

Tianyue,

† †Seriously, I find the second part very telling. Faced with
ridiculous questions Paul was prepared to answer in kind.

† †I find this telling on account of what some people expect
from a "Godman". I find it telling that Paul Twitchell did not
have all the answers - as many people might imagine that
"God" naturally would.

† †Really I'm being serious here. No kidding.

*********

† †I think it shows something especially telling when a story
is told that Paul Twitchell took poison when he knew it would
harm him ... like Buddha when he ate the tainted rice!

† †Why was the story told like that? Because with Paul Twit-
chell's state of consciousness there is no way he could be
poisoned? I listened to the audiotape from 1970 when Paul
talked about this incident. If I'm not mistaken he said that it
knocked him out for about three days! And he didn't sound
to me like someone who knew beforehand that someone
put poison in his juice. I think it's fair to say he might have
had a "feeling" perhaps, that something might not be right.
I doubt though that he knew beforehand how it would later
impact his life. Turning him white and rendering him unable
to walk up his own steps for a time.

Etznab

What I find revealing in his personal readings for indiviudals is the
detail he provides, that he didn't provide in the other readings. He
can tell us the initials of a person to be contacted, who will
telephone whom and at what time, but can't tell us accurately anything
regarding his predictions.

So, I expect the rationalizations will start coming in. It will be
interesting to see what sort of responses people give to PT's failed
predictions. A note to the observant readership: the responses to my
post will reveal as much as the post itself, if you gather my drift.
So...who will be the first to suggest the predictions really are all
true, but apply to some other time period or plane, †that PT was
talking above our heads, or perhaps he saw all this on the inner, thus
saving us from having to endure the experience on the outer, etc.

The instances in which PT's imaginary world collides or interfaces
with the physical world provide the best opportunities to find out if
his imaginings have any real veracity.

Tianyue


I wonder, are predictions of the future and recollections from the
past based on "timelines"?

When a person has a vivid dream of the past, a past life and/or a
premonition of the future ... where is that information coming from?
Timelines? In what context is it comprehended? Hmm... Time?

And when predictions [based on timelines?] don't come true? Oh,
perhaps these timelines change? or, maybe there is no such thing?

Contemplating and being silly.

Etznab












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Post Link Posted: Mon Sep 15 2008 8:33 am
Post subject: Re: Another Look at Paul Twitchell's Eck Vidya Readings
Reply to Tian Yue Reply with quote



Well, the stock market is really crashing today, with major financial
institutions in dire straights. PT thought we would have a great
period of financial security for 25 years. He must have had his eyes
closed when this came up on his inner screen. PT predicted next to
nothing that turned out accurate, but really missed the major events
of the last decades, such as the invasion of Iraq, and the terrorist
attacks of 9/11.

He certainly didn't have a reliable finger on the pulse of the world.
How then, could he have a reliable finger on the pulse of the seeker?
What say you, brothers of the Leaf? Doug?

Tianyue


On Sep 6, 8:35†pm, Tian Yue <tian...@earthlink.net> wrote:

Quote:
ECK-Vidya, The Akasa Science of Prophecy, was a small booklet first
published in 1968. The booklet includes 12 predictions made by PT.
Following are summaries of the 12 predictions, which were allegedly
made by PTís reading of the Eck Vidya. I will add a commentary after
each prediction.

1. † † †California isn't going to sink into the ocean any time soon,
contrary to the Cayce predictions, although it would happen later.

How clever. Let's see...PT predicts that another dubious prediction
won't happen. This is so laughable it hurts! Iíd say there were tens
of millions of Californians (like myself) who expressed the same
prediction by the mere fact of continuing to live in California,
ignoring completely Cayceís warning. PT was no different than the
masses of Californians who happily remained in the state. †I can get
in on this sort of prediction, too... I hereby predict that a comet
will not hit the earth next week, though my astrologist neighbor
predicts the contrary. Geologists have long established that the
tectonic plates would continue to move over eons of time, gradually
separating part of California, including Baja California, from the
North American continent. This has been public knowledge for some
time. Itís an easy assumption to make that people like Cayce and PT
would have heard of this, and that they would make predictions about
it. PTís prediction reflects the common scientific consensus of our
times.

2. Russia would turn to capitalism by the middle of the next decade
(1970's).

Russia turned to capitalism in 1992, when the Soviet Union collapsed.
PT was off by 20 years, but he did get this one right. We all have
musings that turn out to be true. There were free market economists
who predicted the Soviet Unionís demise during the cold war. They
thought communism assuredly would, or even certainly must, fail
miserably within a few years, so flawed they believed the system to
be. They thought it would fail on principle, thus affirming capitalism
as superior. Based on PTís conservative leaning politics, it is fairly
reasonable to assume PT may have been in that camp. Many in the West
fervently hoped communism would fail due to inherent flaws. So this
prediction isnít very impressive or shocking, considering the cold war
rhetoric of the times. Lots of political observers were
prognosticating the Soviet Unionís demise. Letís seeÖI hereby predict
that when Castroís brother dies, thus ending the dynasty, Cuba will
gradually return to a more democratic form of government. There is a
good chance Iíll be right.

3. † † †A tidal wave would damage Hawaii in about 1981 so badly that it
would take several years to rebuild.

This prediction is interesting in what it reveals. His predictions
were made in 1968, eight years after a large tsunami hit the Big
Island causing severe destruction, including 61 deaths and $23 million
in property damage. Another large tsunami occurred in 1946 which
flooded the downtown area of Hilo killing 159 people and causing more
than $26 million in damages. There was a small, insignificant tsunami
in 1975, in which two campers on the beach died, but with little
impact, if any, on the island. So this prediction is flat out
nonsense. And the fact is, 50 tsunamis have occurred in Hawaii since
the early 1800ís, so to predict that yet another in a long history of
frequent tsunami events would again occur is not difficult. But a
major tsunami that inflicted severe damage did not occur, so heís way
off here.

What I find revealing is his failure to predict the recent tsunami of
2004 that truly was an event of enormous magnitude. When viewed in
this context, heís not only wrong about Hawaii, but actually missed
predicting the real tsunami event that, had it been predicted, and had
he any credibility on the world stage, could have saved hundreds of
thousands of lives. So he not only screwed up that prediction, he
doubly screwed up by failing to predict the real tsunami. So much for
his ability to read the Eck Vidya.

4.America will regain her united spirit again and see a higher level
of living and wealth from about 1975-2000.

Despite this claim, as I recall there was a recession in the 1970's
during the oil embargo, and during the 1980's we had a recession,
coupled with high inflation and high interest rates, and †Reagan left
us with staggering, record breaking deficits. During Bill Clintonís
eight year term we had very good stock market returns, and low
unemployment, but that all but vanished under George Bush. The economy
has always had its ups and downs, and always will. Itís not hard to be
correct by predicting "in the future America will unite and have a
better economy" or even to say, "in the future America will be divided
and the economy will be slack." Either way one can't lose, especially
if not held rigidly to a specific time frame. PT used a long period of
25 years in his prediction, but the one consistent period of economic
upturn was the eight years under Clinton between 1992 and 2000.
Economists make predictions all the time, and sometimes they are
right, sometimes they are wrong, but in any case, their occasional
success doesn't make them any more psychic than the average person. By
the way, wages in real dollars are at an all time low. People earn
less now than they did in PTís time. The number of homeless people was
on the rise during the time PT predicted, and poverty was widespread,
but ignored by the average American. The same is true today. Some of
the gains made in the stock market during Clintonís time have been
mitigated by the current downturn. PTís prediction here is very
general and highly debatable, but at best falls short of a big
unifying, bullish period that would last for 25 years. I donít give
him any points here. If heíd wanted to make useful economic
predictions, he would have had to have been far more specific to have
made a significant prediction. I think more people would have wanted
to know about our current mortgage crisis. Too bad PT missed that in
his economic forecast. He also said nothing about poverty in America,
homelessness, decreasing wages, lack of health care, and high costs of
education, and crippling student loans. Cloud nine can be fun, but it
isnít reality.

5. The next great war will be fought not between the nations of this
planet, but between one of the other planets and Earth. This will take
place around 2000.

Whoa, Nelly. Way off the chart on this one, and more than just a tad
loony. And to add to the eyebrow raising silliness, according to some
Eckankar apologists, it may have happened on the inner planes! The
ultimate cop-out. So PTís predictions are all true, they happened on
the inner! I wonder how much of the alien stuff came from his
Scientology influence.

6. The food problem will become acute by around 1980 and the world
will turn to the US to feed them. The US will develop a synthetic food
which will give relief.

A big stretch here, in my view. The U.S. has not come up with a
synthetic food on any mass scale, and it certainly hasnít found a
synthetic food to feed the world. He is wrong in this prediction. By
the way, genetically altered food is not synthetic, and some believe
this development will be looked upon someday as one of the worst
environmental disasters in history as the full consequences take
effect. Europeans are correct in rejecting this technology. Sounds as
though PT had been reading too many science fiction novels. Soylent
Green, anyone?
When PT wrote this (1968) there was a very popular book on the market
that predicted mass world starvation due to the sharply increasing
population. As Wikipedia states, ďThe Population Bomb (1968) is a book
written by Paul R. Ehrlich. A best-selling work, it predicted disaster
for humanity due to overpopulation and the "population explosion". The
book predicted that "in the 1970s and 1980s hundreds of millions of
people will starve to death", that nothing can be done to avoid mass
famine greater than any in the history, and radical action is needed
to limit the overpopulation. History proved Ehrlich wrong, as the mass
starvations predicted for the 1970s and 1980s never occurred.Ē

The bookís warning was very alarming and widely discussed in the
media. But now, world starvation truly is occurring, caused in part by
converting corn crops to ethanol production, thus reducing the food
supply and raising the cost of food, and also by the oil prices, which
affect distribution and even the cost of petroleum based fertilizers.
But still no synthetic food has been produced by the US to save the
world, and in fact, the US may be exacerbating the problem rather than
helping.

It isnít at all a stretch to surmise that a known plagiarist would
read that book (which came out in the same year PT made this
ďpredictionĒ) and convert the bookís thesis into an Eck vidya
prediction. †This isnít plagiary, but PT did opportunistically glean
material from near and far to use in his own writings. Iím shaking my
head with dismay. In any case, he was wrong, as was the author of the
book.

7. The shifting of the polar caps will cause an upset in the world
around 2200.

Quite clever here. Anyone can make a prediction that is so far in the
future that no one will live long enough to see.

Let's see... letís have some fun. Hereís a prediction: Around the year
2300, long after we are all gone and no longer concerned with such
issues, Ronald Reagan will be cloned and return to power with his
memory intact. His first act will be to lead the world against the
aliens who took over in 2200. Klemp, who overcomes his present
illnesses will live to be at least 400 years old, and will accuse
Reagan of encroaching on alien personal property when Reagan steals a
space ship from them and leaves the planet for good, as his planetary
bid for world dominance over aliens fails. Klemp had hoped to make a
deal with the aliens in order to leave the planet ...

read more Ľ












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Post Link Posted: Mon Sep 15 2008 4:42 pm
Post subject: Re: Another Look at Paul Twitchell's Eck Vidya Readings
Reply to TianYue Reply with quote



On Sep 15, 3:58†pm, "Ken" <K...@NowHere.net> wrote:

Quote:
Tian Yue wrote:
Well, the stock market is really crashing today, with major
financial institutions in dire straights. PT thought we
would have a great period of financial security for 25
years. He must have had his eyes closed when this came up on
his inner screen. PT predicted next to nothing that turned
out accurate, but really missed the major events of the last
decades, such as the invasion of Iraq, and the terrorist
attacks of 9/11.

He certainly didn't have a reliable finger on the pulse of
the world. How then, could he have a reliable finger on the
pulse of the seeker? What say you, brothers of the Leaf?
Doug?

Tianyue

If he made that prediction in 1970, 25 years ended on 1995.

--
Ken


Oh, so now you claim he's supposed to have the time period accurate,
even if the prediction is inaccurate. Ken, you're out of your depth.
My point is that he didn't get anything right in what he predicted,
and failed to predict the things that actually have happened. But I
realize that in Eckankar Fantasyland (a very special place) you make
up any history you like. Enjoy that. Knock yourself out. But here's
what really happened:

PT: America will regain her united spirit again and see a higher
level
of living and wealth from about 1975-2000.

Tianyue: Despite this claim, as I recall there was a recession in the
1970's
during the oil embargo [remember the gas lines?], and during the
1980's we had a recession, coupled with high inflation and high
interest rates, and Reagan left
us with staggering, record breaking deficits. During Bill Clintonís
eight year term we had very good stock market returns, and low
unemployment, but that all but vanished under George Bush. The economy
has always had its ups and downs, and always will. Itís not hard to be
correct by predicting "in the future America will unite and have a
better economy" or even to say, "in the future America will be divided
and the economy will be slack." Either way one can't lose, especially
if not held rigidly to a specific time frame. PT used a long period of
25 years in his prediction, but the one consistent period of economic
upturn was the eight years under Clinton between 1992 and 2000.
Economists make predictions all the time, and sometimes they are
right, sometimes they are wrong, but in any case, their occasional
success doesn't make them any more psychic than the average person. By
the way, wages in real dollars are at an all time low. People earn
less now than they did in PTís time. The number of homeless people was
on the rise during the time PT predicted, and poverty was widespread,
but ignored by the average American. The same is true today. Some of
the gains made in the stock market during Clintonís time have been
mitigated by the current downturn. PTís prediction here is very
general and highly debatable, but at best falls short of a big
unifying, bullish period that would last for 25 years. I donít give
him any points here. If heíd wanted to make useful economic
predictions, he would have had to have been far more specific to have
made a significant prediction. I think more people would have wanted
to know about our current mortgage crisis. Too bad PT missed that in
his economic forecast. He also said nothing about poverty in America,
homelessness, decreasing wages, lack of health care, and high costs of
education, and crippling student loans. Cloud nine can be fun, but it
isnít reality.

Tianyue












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Post Link Posted: Mon Sep 15 2008 4:58 pm
Post subject: Re: Another Look at Paul Twitchell's Eck Vidya Readings
Reply to Ken Reply with quote



Tian Yue wrote:

Quote:
Well, the stock market is really crashing today, with major
financial institutions in dire straights. PT thought we
would have a great period of financial security for 25
years. He must have had his eyes closed when this came up on
his inner screen. PT predicted next to nothing that turned
out accurate, but really missed the major events of the last
decades, such as the invasion of Iraq, and the terrorist
attacks of 9/11.

He certainly didn't have a reliable finger on the pulse of
the world. How then, could he have a reliable finger on the
pulse of the seeker? What say you, brothers of the Leaf?
Doug?

Tianyue


If he made that prediction in 1970, 25 years ended on 1995.

--
Ken












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Post Link Posted: Tue Sep 16 2008 2:12 pm
Post subject: Re: Another Look at Paul Twitchell's Eck Vidya Readings
Reply to Ken Reply with quote



TianYue wrote:

Quote:
On Sep 15, 3:58 pm, "Ken" <K...@NowHere.net> wrote:
Tian Yue wrote:
Well, the stock market is really crashing today, with major
financial institutions in dire straights. PT thought we
would have a great period of financial security for 25
years. He must have had his eyes closed when this came up
on his inner screen. PT predicted next to nothing that
turned out accurate, but really missed the major events of
the last decades, such as the invasion of Iraq, and the
terrorist attacks of 9/11.

He certainly didn't have a reliable finger on the pulse of
the world. How then, could he have a reliable finger on the
pulse of the seeker? What say you, brothers of the Leaf?
Doug?

Tianyue

If he made that prediction in 1970, 25 years ended on 1995.

--
Ken

Oh, so now you claim he's supposed to have the time period
accurate, even if the prediction is inaccurate. Ken, you're
out of your depth. My point is that he didn't get anything
right in what he predicted, and failed to predict the things
that actually have happened. But I realize that in Eckankar
Fantasyland (a very special place) you make up any history
you like. Enjoy that. Knock yourself out. But here's what
really happened:

PT: America will regain her united spirit again and see a
higher level
of living and wealth from about 1975-2000.

Tianyue: Despite this claim, as I recall there was a
recession in the 1970's
during the oil embargo [remember the gas lines?], and during
the 1980's we had a recession, coupled with high inflation
and high interest rates, and Reagan left
us with staggering, record breaking deficits. During Bill
Clintonís eight year term we had very good stock market
returns, and low unemployment, but that all but vanished
under George Bush. The economy has always had its ups and
downs, and always will. Itís not hard to be correct by
predicting "in the future America will unite and have a
better economy" or even to say, "in the future America will
be divided and the economy will be slack." Either way one
can't lose, especially if not held rigidly to a specific
time frame. PT used a long period of 25 years in his
prediction, but the one consistent period of economic upturn
was the eight years under Clinton between 1992 and 2000.
Economists make predictions all the time, and sometimes they
are right, sometimes they are wrong, but in any case, their
occasional success doesn't make them any more psychic than
the average person. By the way, wages in real dollars are at
an all time low. People earn less now than they did in PTís
time. The number of homeless people was on the rise during
the time PT predicted, and poverty was widespread, but
ignored by the average American. The same is true today.
Some of the gains made in the stock market during Clintonís
time have been mitigated by the current downturn. PTís
prediction here is very general and highly debatable, but at
best falls short of a big unifying, bullish period that
would last for 25 years. I donít give him any points here.
If heíd wanted to make useful economic predictions, he would
have had to have been far more specific to have made a
significant prediction. I think more people would have
wanted to know about our current mortgage crisis. Too bad PT
missed that in his economic forecast. He also said nothing
about poverty in America, homelessness, decreasing wages,
lack of health care, and high costs of education, and
crippling student loans. Cloud nine can be fun, but it isnít
reality.

Tianyue



Good god you're a depressing individual.

--
Ken












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